1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Floor to ceiling book case

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Jupiter01, 3 Sep 2020.

  1. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I have a wall which is approximately 2.3m high and 3m wide. I’d like to build a decent looking bookcase in this space and need your advice please.

    This is the type of look I want to achieve. Less the doors.

    Firstly which wood should I build this in? I want to eventually paint it white and be using a wood which will be easy to maintain i.e. if it gets damaged, I should be able to fill, sand and paint.
    Also want to avoid expansion/contraction as much as possible.

    Secondly, is it worth cutting shelves slightly short of the total depth available to allow light to flow from the top, down through all the shelves?

    Thirdly, does this have trims stuck on the face of all the wood to create the wide aesthetic look?

    Thanks in advance.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Sponsored Links
  3. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    16,210
    Thanks Received:
    1,812
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Looks like 18mm mdf structure, easy to assemble, trim to edges looks like more mdf strips around 50mm wide.
    Very easy to add led strip lighting to rear of trims to illuminate the contents.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    A few more questions please:
    Is MDF spared from expansion contraction?
    Will it need priming before glossing?
    Should I use 18mm or 12mm in your opinion?

    Thanks for your help.
     
  5. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    16,210
    Thanks Received:
    1,812
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Dimensionally stable, prime and use short bristle roller for smooth finish.
    18mm mdf , 12mm too thin for fixings and often more expensive than 18mm.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. jonbey

    jonbey

    Joined:
    17 May 2012
    Messages:
    5,278
    Thanks Received:
    289
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for all the responses. Slight change of plan with this...
    I want to build a modern bookcase and the design I have selected will allow me to use all the off cuts and make this up as I go along to some extent...

    upload_2020-9-8_13-4-36.png

    It's also practical as I can different sized sections for different size of books.

    Can this also be done in MDF and should it still be 18mm?

    Thanks again.
     
  8. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    16,210
    Thanks Received:
    1,812
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The unit in pic is probably 18mm mdf.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  9. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for all your help. On fixings, is it a case of pre drilling and popping vertical screws through the horizontal section and into the vertical sections of MDF. I can then countersunk and fill before I paint.

    Any suggestions on the screw type and size I should use for this project?
     
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. Ryler

    Ryler

    Joined:
    21 Oct 2019
    Messages:
    2,366
    Thanks Received:
    161
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    SPAX® MDF/Hardwood screws are specifically designed to prevent splitting in medium density fiberboard (MDF) and hardwoods without pre-drilling.
    Some use plaster board screws.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Would 50mm be adequate?
     
  13. mrrusty

    mrrusty

    Joined:
    1 May 2018
    Messages:
    264
    Thanks Received:
    62
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The detail of the execution of that is going to be the success or fail. With such a simple design the finish and execution has to be perfect or it will look like a bodgers build. To buy something like that would cost several £100's, so invest in some tools. If you are going to use painted MDF, then perhaps a track-saw for perfectly cut straight edges. Use dowels or biscuits to join the pieces together. Note how the pieces on the left have buttresses to stop the shelves all collapsing. A dowel jig at the very least will help you to line everything up. If you think about it, you can't rely on screws because many of the joints are not screwable. Horizontals have to rest on verticals - don't be tempted to butt horizontals to verticals and screw in from the side!

    MDF needs a paint/sealer application which will raise the "grain" and then it needs sanding/wirewooling back before the final coat. I suggest you try and paint as much as you can before assembly. Perhaps consider a spray finish for the final coat. I'm sure other furniture makers will give more advice - I'm a better maker than painter...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks @mrrusty.
    I was going to use my Makita circular saw with guides clamped on the MDF to get all the straight cuts.

    I hadn't appreciated that there will be a few joints that I am unable to screw but, I will be able to screw a majority of these as I understand it? With joints like this:

    upload_2020-9-9_11-9-13.png
    Should I glue and dowel?
     
  15. mrrusty

    mrrusty

    Joined:
    1 May 2018
    Messages:
    264
    Thanks Received:
    62
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes, glue and dowel as much as you can. Also looking at that design it's very clever - it looks random but the uprights are carefully positioned to spread the load. Obviously the uprights low down are taking all the weight of the higher levels. You will have to be careful you don't have uprights bearing on widely unsupported horizontals, or they will bend.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Jupiter01

    Jupiter01

    Joined:
    30 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2,559
    Thanks Received:
    27
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I will try to follow a similar format for mine but without having a detailed design, it will be based on approximations e.g. have the same number of uprights in a given tier and approximately the same shaped squares/rectangles - to achieve similar aesthetics.

    I am hoping that this will also help with strength given your comment on their clever design but I think the key is to avoid any wide unsupported horizontal shelves?
     
  17. wgt52

    wgt52

    Joined:
    25 Apr 2016
    Messages:
    703
    Thanks Received:
    130
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Find Peter Millard on Youtoobe and take note of his guidance on materials, finishing, assembling, etc. He has several clips on making units similar to what you want. Using MDF you may be better off with using MR MDF.
     
Loading...

Share This Page