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Forward planning for new kitchen - electrical wiring

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by jpowell79, 23 Feb 2021 at 7:00 PM.

  1. jpowell79

    jpowell79

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    Before I even begin this thread, I just want to state that I have no intention of doing this work myself! I'm not a qualified spark, and I will be getting one in. Part of the reason I'm asking the question is because I want to do some forward planning in terms of exactly where I want sockets, and the type of "visible" sockets and connectors I want to have on show, so want to know exactly what I'm talking about when I discuss with the spark. Ideally, all I'd like to see "on show" on each side of the kitchen on each splash back is 1x double gang socket and 1x 32amp DP switch.

    Ok....so basically I've ordered a Neff Pyrolite built-in oven (rated to 16a) one one side of the kitchen, and an AEG 32a induction hob on the other side of the kitchen. The sockets I want to get are the MK Albany plus range, and in terms of isolation, I'd like to have one socket for isolation on either side of the kitchen next to new double-gang sockets to make everything nice and tidy and symmetrical!

    I also want to account for future upgrades, and it seems like more and more appliances are moving from "hardwired" to plug in 13amp plugs, so I'd like to factor in potentially being ready for both and a later date.

    So in my mind, in the CU I would have a 16amp RCBO for the oven and a 32amp RCBO for the Induction hob.

    I'd have 6mm T&E run from each of these RCBO's to the MK Albany plus 32a DP switches on the countertops, and then from there have 6mm T&E running to dual 45amp cooker connection plates.

    From there, on each of the dual cooker connection plates, I'd have 2.5mm T&E going to an un-switched 13amp socket (in this case wouldn't be used, as both appliances will be hardwired, but allows for future-proofing by just downrating the RCBO's) and then basically the Neff Oven and the Induction hob are then just hardwired into each cooker connection plate.

    Like this....

    kitchen wiring.png


    Apart from that, It'll be an MK "grid" switch plate on the side wall (which will be part of the kitchen ring), with switches for the washing machine, dishwasher, fridge, cooker hood, & microwave..... with un-switched 13a sockets behind each appliance.

    Can anyone see any issue with this? If I ask the electrician to do this, will there be any issues?
     
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  3. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    Looks ok to me, lots of future proofing, very sensible.

    Some 16amp ovens have tiny connections at the back, and it may be a struggle fitting 6mm2 cable. And some have a lead and there is a special plug connection at the back of the oven.

    As regards to the overall design, no doubt your electrician will have a moan and won't want to go to all that trouble...
     
  4. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Well, it is recommended to have sockets at one metre intervals so only two in a kitchen is not ideal - but obviously it is your house.

    Sockets do not isolate, as such. Do you mean the 'cooker' switches?

    Very few appliances are hard-wired.

    Could do, but may as well have both 32A.

    Of course.

    Don't really know what that means electrically; I know what the words mean.

    Of course. How else?

    Purely a personal choice so up to you. Not a requirement electrically.

    Only that you don't really know what to do.

    I recommend you employ the electrician now and tell him what accessories you want where and let him design the circuits.
     
  5. jpowell79

    jpowell79

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    I’ve only got space for one double socket on each side.... it’s a small kitchen and I need to abide by the 30cm distance from the hob on either side and on the other side of the hob there will be small shelves.

    On the oven side there is a serving hatch so only have space for one double gang that side as well. Can’t ever see more than four thing plugged in at once on the countertop. We have the kettle and toaster.... maybe pull out the blender from the cupboard a couple of times a week. Can’t really see why we’d need any more.

    ok I said sockets, but if you look at the diagram you can clearly see I mean 32a DP switches as that’s what’s being shown above the counter.

    You said that very few appliances are hardwired.... specifically regarding electric hobs and ovens, both brand new appliances require hardwiring... I appreciate that a lot of manufacturers are now shipping ovens with 13amp plugs, hence the reason for mentioning “future-proofing”

    What’s the advantage of a 32a RCBO on a 16a rated oven?
     
  6. jpowell79

    jpowell79

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    thanks, a simple, straightforward response. Much appreciated (y)
     
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  8. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    Based on the principle you can't overload an oven, the oven could be put on a 32 amp RCBO - only so you don't have to change the RCBO in the future if you ever fit a larger oven, or add to the circuit.

    Indeed, with a 16 amp oven circuit, the 13 amp socket you have included on it may be limited in what load could be plugged into it.
     
  9. sparkwright

    sparkwright

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    It may be an idea to ditch the single sockets, and just fit a single flex outlet plate. The flex outlet plate could easily be changed for a single socket with little fuss.

    It's your money.
     
  10. jpowell79

    jpowell79

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    Makes sense, thanks (y)
     
  11. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I wanted my mothers house rewired, the first quote I said what I wanted, the second quote I got him to recommend what I should have, and the cost was nearly half the first quote, you can over think what is required, and electricians will do as you ask, but can cost you dear, so let them recommend and see if you like what they say first.
     
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