How much for new sash windows?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by emilybronte, 17 Feb 2015.

  1. emilybronte

    emilybronte

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    How much should I expect to pay for a new double glazed wood sash window approx 1m x 1.5m, with 8 smaller panes within each half? (We actually need 12 new windows, but have no idea how much to allow).

    They will be painted, so we if go for softwood rather than hardwood, would that be significantly cheaper, or not?

    And how much should it cost to have them fitted?

    Many thanks for any info.
     
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  3. foxhole

    foxhole

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    You need quotes from local suppliers.
     
  4. GrinAndBearIt

    GrinAndBearIt

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    I disagree! Don't be scared of getting quotes from further afield ... e.g. Poland. We ordered up 30+ sash windows from that part of the world, and a year on, we couldn't be happier.
     
  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Remind me to take you off ny Christmas card list..........
     
  6. GrinAndBearIt

    GrinAndBearIt

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    Charming! And suddenly we are plunged headlong into the world of UKIP & xenophobia etc. ...
     
  7. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    And as a British tradesman I'm not supposed to feel piqued at your comments? Especially the holier than thou, PC leftist last post. It's not as though I accused you of being a cheap, money grubbing cheapskate, now is it?

    As to the UKIP and xenophobia comments how wrong you are! I have lived and worked outside of the UK and can speak a couple of European languages reasonably fluently (other than gibberish or English!). For that reason I am actually much in favour of the EU. Now can we stop trading insults, please?

    I am becoming dubious of the Internet because it all ends up coming down to lowest price - with no allowance for any service element (something which I feel sure will bite a lot of people in the arse in years to come). Presumably unlike you, I do, however, still believe in supporting my local economy where and when I can. If people don't do that then any craft skills we have left here will simply disappear. No doubt this will be accompanied by the plaintive wails of the "chattering classes" that they "just can't get good quality British stuff any more" (although maybe not - they seem to only ever bother about the bottom line, not where it comes from or how it's made). These are the self same people who talk in terms of "good Polish joiners" when we all know they mean "cheap Polish joiners". Never mind the quality, feel the width.....
     
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  8. GrinAndBearIt

    GrinAndBearIt

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    Don't be piqued! Don't feel threatened! Should I feel ashamed of my German car? Step up & promote yourself ... ie. compete ... win us back!

    To be perfectly honest, the level of service I got from the Polish company was fantastic. Every email answered in a timely fashion, and nothing was ever too much trouble.

    Anyway - you've been very helpful on other matters J&K, so I'm sorry that I seem to have upset you with my international focus ... although I think as a general rule it doesn't hurt to explore other ideas/markets.
     
  9. emilybronte

    emilybronte

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    Oh, for cying out loud.

    Now we've got all that off our chests, could I make it clear that I shall employ a local firm but I don't want to waste their time by getting them round to quote if I am being wildy unrealistic about the cost before I've even started.

    Let me rephrase!

    Is a window of the type I have described in #1, going to cost me, including VAT, but excluding fitting:

    (i) about £500 ?

    (ii) between £500 and £800 ?

    (iii) between £800 and £1100?

    (iv) a different amount? (What?)

    And what's the going rate to fit working sash windows in a stone cottage, please?
     
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  11. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Either (i) or (ii) depending on hardwood/softwood, spring counterbalance or corded and the type of glazing supplied (i.e. single large pane or individual panes and also super thin or standard DG units). Fundamentally a basic not too large softwood counterbalance 4-pane sash set, unglazed, primed should run out at £325 to £375 (at least that's what I paid last time I had some softwood ones made). Hardwood, depending on species, should put £50 to £100 on that, although the sill for a softwood window should in any case should be in hardwood these days to meet current standards. Another possibility is to ask about the use of recycled pitch pine, which whilst nearly as expensive as oak these days is extremely hard and very durable and should be available in Yorkshire as it is recycled from mill beams. If going for traditional counterbalance weights insist on midfeathers (these should be made from something like HDPE or the like so they don't rot) which prevent the weights from banging into each other as the sashes are raised and lowered. On upper floors consider paying extra for a sash access kit, (sometimes called a Simplex System) which will allow you to swing lower sashes on upper windows inside for cleaning - both safer and easier. Not sure what the glazing will cost - there are too many variables in there for me to say.

    In general when I'm doing these it's a case of refurb rather than replace - conservation and all that - but the main area of failure is the sill. Other things where people go wrong is not to paint their windows for years and years (not good) and to let decorators get away with painting any brush strips in (if that happens they'll need replacement - see Mighton link above or try Reddiseals). Oddly enough windows painted with old-fashioned chalk-, lead- or oil-based paints seem to survive much better than those finished in modern alkyd paints - so it may be worth looking at paints such as Holkham Paint (now called Precious Earth)

    The cost of installation? I'd work on a rate of 2 to 3 windows a day for a man and lad. Hacking out the old windows is incredibly messy and when the new ones go in the reveals will need to be boarded out and replastered, unless your building has shutters, in which case the job will possibly take a bit more time.
     
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  12. Norcon

    Norcon

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  13. GrinAndBearIt

    GrinAndBearIt

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    My dodgy fly-by-night, no questions asked windows came in at £885 per window ... delivered, double glazed primed & painted. My windows averaged 2.4 square metres in area, so for your size (1.5 sq m), that would equate to £550 all done and ready to fit. These were sprung balanced, but cord & weight would only have been 10% more I think from memory.

    Hope that helps.
     
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  14. emilybronte

    emilybronte

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  15. Norcon

    Norcon

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    Wooden windows = maintainence every year, paint peeling, cracking, timber swelling and the slide jamming.

    PVC = a wipe with a cloth every once in a while.
    Soon as I have the shekels my wooden windows will be in the stove.
     
  16. noseall

    noseall

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    Here in England we have conservation areas etc which can mean no plastic windows. Did You not read Emilywotsits' post?
     
  17. emilybronte

    emilybronte

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    Thank you. This is indeed the case.

    And PVC windows are aesthetically nasty, for the most part. People in this part of the world are ripping them out and re-installing wooden ones and it seems to be improving the value of their homes, judging by the prices they are achieving.

    I'm a decorator, so painting wooden ones isn't a problem for me. And if it is done properly, it shouldn't be an annual event. Correctly prepared, oil-painted windows should last up to 8 years before they need re-doing. If yours peeled after one year they cannot have been done properly.
     
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