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How to get permission to live on my land?

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by PopsiT, 10 Oct 2017.

  1. PopsiT

    PopsiT

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    Hello - I'm a newbie so please don't shoot me down! :)

    I’m after some general advice/steering please.

    If I were to buy land (around 12acres) and keep farming animals, birds, and horses/ponies on there. What would I need to do to get permission to live the land in a log cabin or mobile home? I know it’s really tricky to get planning permission to reside on the land… Do you know of an easier way (loophole) around it please?

    The reason being - I can’t bear the thought of some vile person attacking my animals in the middle of the night when I’m not there to protect them, I hear too many horror stories!
    I could run a small holding but I can't kill anything, I'm a huge animal lover.


    Can you offer me any advice please?
     
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  3. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Pitch a tent?
    Seriously, if it were that easy, everyone would be buying cheap land, put a few animals on it and build a house. Plus another for the kids. And one for their parents........
    Failing that, buy a house with some land attached to keep the animals and birds that you have not yet got.
     
  4. PopsiT

    PopsiT

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    Thanks Motman, I know it's really difficult that's why I ended up at this forum! :)
     
  5. GeoffJ

    GeoffJ

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    If your purpose is limited only to the well-being of your animals then this might present a way froward. However, if your intent is to game the planning system then this idea is non-starter.

    There has been a case (details?) where permission for a house, built of "eco-friendly design & materials" was granted with the express condition that once the applicant no longer chose to reside in it (eg sale, death or otherwise) then the building structure would be completely removed and the land returned to its natural state.
     
  6. PopsiT

    PopsiT

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    Thanks Geoff, yes the welfare on my animals is always at the forefront of my mind. I won't keep my horse anywhere where the owner of the farm doesn't live there !
     
  7. Notch7

    Notch7

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    Im sure Ive seen a grand designs type programme where somebody got planning permission for a temporary structure.

    If you hoping to get pp on green belt for change of use from agricultural land to build any form of house, you just wont.

    And dont build a castle behind straw bales :D
     
  8. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    All land has a "use class" which defines what can be done on it. Find out what class yours is, and then determine if you can build a habitable building for all year or part year or need permission to do so.

    Then apply for the permission.

    Typically, the council will resist granting permission for general dwellings in the green belt or countryside generally. But if the building relates to the use of the land or a job working on the land then that's more likely to be granted - but is still very difficult to get.
     
  9. Brigade77

    Brigade77

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    I'm a little puzzled by the whole concept of putting animals onto land & then worrying about something happening to them.

    Have you considered not putting any pets / animals onto the land ?
     
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  11. Mottie

    Mottie

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    It might have been this one.



    I think he got permission to live in it for life and then it reverts back to woodland. I seem to remember that he got it on the grounds that he owned and managed the woods it was in or something like that.

    Bloke has his own website. http://ben-law.co.uk/
     
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  12. garyo

    garyo

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    The agricultural justification was being abused and I think the current tac they take is that you need to be able to earn a viable living from the land, and that requires a sensible scale in whatever you do. For a small parcel of land I think you can still just about do it by putting a 15000 chicken shed in, but it's a big punt to take, and you'd still need PP for the chicken shed.
     
  13. JohnD

    JohnD

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    horses are, with almost no exceptions in the UK, not agricultural animals.

    If you use yours primarily for ploughing and drawing your wagons, you might be able to argue your case.
     
  14. noseall

    noseall

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    Me too.
    Anyhow, the concept of keeping animals on land and looking after them locally, already exists. They are called farms.

    If you are going to live in the country along side those that do farm animals professionally, you need to lose your fuzzy warm storybook approach that all animals are treated as cuddly pets. You may be in for a shock.

    Frickin horses on roads - who came up with that idea? When are they going to fit them with brakes and lights and a tolerance for something louder than a sneeze or a pace quicker than a snail.
     
  15. motorbiking

    motorbiking

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    submit an 'agricultural prior notice consent form' to the local planning office detailing the agricultural building you intend to build on your land. This is 'permitted development' on agricultural land and hence doesn't need planning permission. You should receive consent within 28 days and are then entitled to commence building.

    You can then legally site a temporary mobile home on the land to live in whilst you build your barn (and set up your business). Your temporary accommodation can remain in place for five years (presumably as long as you are still building your barn) during which time you need to develop your business to generate as much income as possible.

    At the end of five years you apply for planning permission to build a house. You must prove that you need to live on-site in order to run your business, e.g. caring for livestock that breed all year round, and that your business generates sufficient income to support you.
     
  16. chappers

    chappers

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    Exactly and the act is called farming, not running a petting zoo. The OP needs to find a house with land

    maybe need to ask who ever thought of making a motorised horse.
     
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  17. Nakajo

    Nakajo

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    Does the business actually need to be viable?
     
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