How to replace this kitchen sink tap?

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Hi All,

I want to replace this leaking tap

1709392664534.png


with this new tap

1709392703760.png


and I'm wondering how to get the old tap out.

I've got a tube spanner to get at the nut but am worried out where to separate the pipes.

1709392816025.png


1709392839298.png


1709392856021.png


Those isolators look like a good place but they look like they're single use press fit?

So you can press them together but you can't pull them apart?

Looking at it, it seems like if I separate the pipes under the isolators, they won't go through the hole for the tap.

I'm not sure how to gain access to separate the pipes above the isolators.

A saw wire ?


1709393407022.png



Any tips greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Wilson.
 
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Many don't agree with me but I just took the sink out.
Never took long. Maybe 10 mins. Undo the copper pipe fittings and lift the sink out with tap attached.
Fit new tap to sink but don't use flexible pipes because of the health concerns. Use copper tap connectors.
I just used polymer mastic to drop sink back on. Tighten brackets.
Fitted new pipes and isolator valves
 
You need a set of these:


Andy
 
If access to above the isolators is a problem, cut pipes below isolators (having turned off H&C elsewhere). Undo nut and remove horseshoe clamp. This will allow tap to be lifted enough so that you can hacksaw through the copper tails.
 
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You need a set of these:


Andy

Is it true that their box spanners will fit inside each other if you need to extend them?
 
Hi All,

I want to replace this leaking tap

View attachment 335117

with this new tap

View attachment 335118

and I'm wondering how to get the old tap out.

I've got a tube spanner to get at the nut but am worried out where to separate the pipes.

View attachment 335119

View attachment 335120

View attachment 335121

Those isolators look like a good place but they look like they're single use press fit?

So you can press them together but you can't pull them apart?

Looking at it, it seems like if I separate the pipes under the isolators, they won't go through the hole for the tap.

I'm not sure how to gain access to separate the pipes above the isolators.

A saw wire ?


View attachment 335122


Any tips greatly appreciated!

Cheers,

Wilson.

The tails running up to the tap will have an o-ring, unwind the tails, plus the hex fitting, and the tap will lift out without issue.
 
Separate the pipes under the isolators and lift the taps up as far as they will go which then should give you room to cut the pipes feeding into the taps with a junior hacksaw .Make sure you have undone the tsp retaining bolt before you start messing about with the pipework just incase undoing doesn't go smoothly
 
@evildrome Just for info, those isolating valves are de-mountable metal push fits similar to this, and yes they can be taken apart - but its a bit harder than plastic push fits as the copper ring needs to be pressed in evenly to release the pipe grips and kept pressed in whilst the pipe is removed. There is actually a proper plastic release tool shown attached here which costs less than a fiver, but even if you happened to have one, it would be a little bit fiddly to do it this way.

i.e. you'd have to undo the horseshoe clamp securing the tap. Drain down the pipe that has what looks like a compression T at the bottom, undo that compression nut, and take hold of that section of pipe and apply upward pressure whilst applying the release tool to the top of the isolating valve on the other pipe (having made sure that is turned off first!). The tap/pipe should go up a bit pulling the tail out the isolating valve. You are then free to apply the release tool to the top of the isolating valve on your lump of pipe and pull that down. Both tap tails are now free from both isolating valves and you can lift the tap out.
 

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@evildrome Just for info, those isolating valves are de-mountable metal push fits similar to this, and yes they can be taken apart - but its a bit harder than plastic push fits as the copper ring needs to be pressed in evenly to release the pipe grips and kept pressed in whilst the pipe is removed. There is actually a proper plastic release tool shown attached here which costs less than a fiver, but even if you happened to have one, it would be a little bit fiddly to do it this way.

i.e. you'd have to undo the horseshoe clamp securing the tap. Drain down the pipe that has what looks like a compression T at the bottom, undo that compression nut, and take hold of that section of pipe and apply upward pressure whilst applying the release tool to the top of the isolating valve on the other pipe (having made sure that is turned off first!). The tap/pipe should go up a bit pulling the tail out the isolating valve. You are then free to apply the release tool to the top of the isolating valve on your lump of pipe and pull that down. Both tap tails are now free from both isolating valves and you can lift the tap out.

What is the main advantage of the metal fittings over plastic ones?
 
What is the main advantage of the metal fittings over plastic ones?
Good question - given the concern you most often hear about any push fit system is whether the seals will stand the test of time, rather than the body. The only genuine advantage I can think of is if you're using copper pipe, they should preserve earth continuity as the pipes should be earth bonded somewhere in the system. I probably wouldn't use plastic push fit near any sources of significant heat either as that could degrade the plastic body over time. But If I'm brutally honest, I hardly ever use push fit of any kind - I will always solder if I can. Just a personal preference.
 
Heres what I would do, I have just done mine few weeks ago .
Cut the pipe on the left about level with the T junction top nut and fit a compression isolator valve, but where you cut this pipe needs to be in the right place so that when the isolator valve is on top that the tails of the tap reach the isolater valve nicely. But looking at it I dont think it would reach so maybe first fit a compression 15mm to 15mm and add a short length of 15mm.
Then replace the compression T junction on the right pipe with a new one and replace the already repaired extended pipe on top of it with a length that you will then fit the other isolator valve. The length needs to be correct again so the tails reach it.

1709466157482.png

This way there is no tool needed to remove the push fit and it gets replaced with a compression fit. The beauty of the flexible tails is you don't have to be exact. BUT it looks like your tails have rubber washer in the nut - if so you need a flat top isolator valve, One of these https://www.toolstation.com/flat-fa...valve/p95064?_br_psugg_q=15+mm+isolator+valve otherwise a normal compression fitting one will have a tapered top for the olive and can cut your rubber washer.
For cutting the pipe I recommend one of these
pipe.JPG
 
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Another thing I encountered is that the horseshoe and single bolt fitting were rusty and I bent the tube cross bar which was quickly replaced with a screwdriver shaft. But it was so rusted that the nut did not move but instead the whole threaded bar came out of the tap - but its the same result.
I see that your new tap comes with a new horseshoe but was using the same tap so I brought a replacement fixing kit.

A tip - buy some puppy training pads, they are great for soaking up any water, they have a waterproof backing and padding that soak up the water. They are very cheap too. £5 for 50 from home bargains My Pets Puppy Training Pads 50 Pack.
Use them whilst doing the job and also leave a couple under there the first night its done just in case it decides to leak for 8 hours whilst you are asleep. Which will require you to give the compression joints a nip up.
 
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A bit late now as you have a new tap but where was the tap leaking because you can get new cartridges.
 
Fit new tap to sink but don't use flexible pipes because of the health concerns. Use copper tap connectors.
Do you mean do not use the supplied tails. What are the health concerns with the tails. I know they are supposed to have a life span. Also the tails screw directly into the tap so is there a 15mm to 10/12mm tail thread adapter available.
 

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