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Hyundai brake pipe

Discussion in 'Car Repairs / Maintenance' started by DIYspanner, 3 Oct 2020.

  1. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    2009 i20 1.4 PB has a weeping spot on one of the long runs to the back so on the drive till fixed.

    Anyone know what size/standard of pipe and fittings Hyundai use?

    Are the in situ jointing tools worth considering?
     
    Last edited: 4 Oct 2020
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  3. Mottie

    Mottie

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    I would imagine they will be standard metric pipe and fittings. Joining tool is worth considering if the rest of the pipe is in good condition and will be a PITA to replace completely.
     
  4. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    I've had a look at the pipes and they appear to be steel due the brown rust. They're insulated and where they've corroded, are behind a plastic cover.

    Need to find a tool that can flare steel pipe I suppose.

    The red arrow is the point of corrosion.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    It's going to be pretty tight to get a jointer in there I guess - however, a motor factor will make you up a full pipe if you can get it to them - saves the tool outlay if its a one off.
    John :)
     
  6. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    I'll call the local factors tomorrow and see what's available.
    There's the likes of these which I could use to fit these joints.
     
  7. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Useful parts!
    I think you'll have an issue forming single flares with hand held gear under the car if the pipes are steel though.....possible enough with cupro nickel.
    Expect to lose 6mm of pipe per flare as well as cutting away the corrosion - it's unusual to have enough spare pipe to do this.
    John :)
     
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  8. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    I've considered various options. If I do joints on the existing pipe, I'll likely have to put a new section in to make up the length.

    I'll call the local Hyundai tomorrow and ask about the original pipe.
     
  9. Stivino

    Stivino

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    I patched up this steel pipe earlier this year using the tool in your link. Albeit that I didn't have to get under the car but it is doable. Old pipe.jpg End product.jpg New pipes.jpg
     
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  11. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    Access is not an issue, its the long run to the back on the underside of the floorpan and I honestly don't know why the plastic cover was fitted. The pipes are insulated so any sections repaired that will have to be stripped of insulation and a nice coating of grease after job complete.

    Will inquire tomorrow what is available and go from there.
     
  12. Stivino

    Stivino

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    I would suggest that you look carefully at the pipe and decide the best place to cut it. Make sure that the section where you will be putting the new male end is as clean as you can possibly get it because once you cut the pipe you will be losing fluid so you need to be prepared with your flaring tool. Also, as soon as you have flared it, blank it off so that you have all the time in the world to work on the "downstream" part of the pipe.
    To blank it off, you can use your new double female connector blocked off with a male in the other end and a piece of rubber or something.
    I use these.
     
  13. Mottie

    Mottie

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    That’s got to be an Escort!

    OP, Remove brake fluid cap, lay some thick polythene over the neck, refit cap and as air can no longer get in, very little fluid will leak out.
     
  14. Stivino

    Stivino

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    It's an Avensis.
    I've tried every which way to prevent the fluid running out, now I just prepare for it and make sure that I cut the pipe, get the new end on, flare it and cap it as quick as possible.
     
  15. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Excellent repair, Stivino (y)
    It's getting the unions undone that does my head in....especially on French kit.
    John :)
     
  16. Mottie

    Mottie

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    Blimey- I’d have sworn it was a Mk6 Escort where the felt wheel arch liner holds water and rests on the brake pipe. Had quite a few of them burst when holding the brake pressure on during MOT's.
     
  17. Stivino

    Stivino

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    I've just looked at your link, it links to an SAE tool. I think you should look for a DIN tool.
     
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