Ideas for hanging a ceiling fan ?

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We have a lounge with a high ceiling - one of those with no attic, just the ceiling following the underside of the roof timbers. In the middle there's a flat strip where it's boarded horizontally underneath the steel ridge beam. From the old attic, I've been able to get access to the end of the ridge beam and can see down the small space - the plasterboard is flush to the underside of the RSJ flange and is fastened at each side to the sloping timbers. At least no problem fishing a cable through :)
I picked up a rather nice, but large and heavy, ceiling fan/light fitting at a local charity shop and want to get it put up.
I was hoping there'd be some battens running across to screw into - but no such luck :(
The RSJ flange is a little over 4" wide, and the mounting holes in the fan hanging bracket are slots allowing a range of around 3½ to 4½" between centres. That does mean that I could (theoretically) put a screw either side of the flange - but providing something for the screw to go into would be problematic, working 7' down a narrow gap (must be scope for gynaecologist or proctologist jokes there).
The options I've come up with so far are :
  • Nail a round piece of wood (which would end up as a visible pattress) through the plasterboard to the RSJ - and then screw the hanging bracket to the pattress. But I don't know anyone with a Hilti to nail it on with so that's out, and there's also the issue that there's 2off T&E cables running along there and I'd be "a tad annoyed" if a nail went through one (or both) of them).
  • Drill and tap the flange, and either mount the bracket direct or use a pattress. Doable, but not easy working on top of ladders that are probably a bit short for the working height.
  • Cut a hole in the plasterboard either side of the flange, manipulate some bits of batten in there, then screw up a piece of wood (same visible pattress as first option) so the battens clamp down onto the flange. The pattress would need to be big enough to cover the holes in the plasterboard.
  • The issues of working at that distance notwithstanding, the above but manipulating the battens down the gap and somehow positioning them in the right place.
Any other ideas or comments ?

Oh yes, here's a photo from the estate agents brochure, unfortunately it doesn't show the highest bit of the ceiling I'm referring to.
14 Holly Bank - Lounge(small).jpg
 
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bolts.jpg


J bolts hooked over the edge of the flange, via tiny holes in the plasterboard.
2 each side. Some form of metal plate / bracket will be required in the centre under the beam to attach the bolts to and provide something to fix the fan bracket to.

With proper positioning there should be room to conceal the bolts and bracket behind the fan covering so nothing will be seen after installation.
 
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J bolts hooked over the edge of the flange, via tiny holes in the plasterboard.
2 each side. Some form of metal plate / bracket will be required in the centre under the beam to attach the bolts to and provide something to fix the fan bracket to.
With proper positioning there should be room to conceal the bolts and bracket behind the fan covering so nothing will be seen after installation.
Now that's something I hadn't thought of. Can't see any way to put the bolts through without making a slot at least as long as the overall width of the hook.
Caddy do a range of clips that fit on rsj either by knocking on or tightening a peice of studding, using them would leave 2 protruding fixed studs, to either fit a wooden patress or possibly just the fan bracket.
Britclip do them as well, in several styles. I just can't see how I'd get into the space above the ceillng to tighten the bolt and locking nut.
Tie the cat to the fan.
If that was a joke then it was in rather bad taste; if it wasn't a joke then you really are a sick person.
 
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Can we have a picture of the garden, the bath and the front door too please?
They are about as useful as the Op pic. :)
 
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When designing the method of fixing take into account that a fan like this

ceiling fan.jpg


will exert a twisting force on the attachment as well as the vertical force of it's weight.
 
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Britclip do them as well, in several styles. I just can't see how I'd get into the space above the ceillng to tighten the bolt and locking nut.

.

you dont, you use it upside down, throw the bolt away and screw in stud, as you screw it in from below it will clamp itself
 
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When designing the method of fixing take into account that a fan like this ... will exert a twisting force on the attachment as well as the vertical force of it's weight.
Indeed, though the torque isn't large - it's easy to hold it up in one hand (for testing purposes), the hardest part of that is holding it far enough away to avoid being hit by the blades :eek:
What's probably more important is that they tend to wobble a bit - how much depends on how well balanced the fan assembly is.
you dont, you use it upside down, throw the bolt away and screw in stud, as you screw it in from below it will clamp itself
Ah, yes I see what you had in mind. Specs on the Britclip ones are here, I'd definitely have to use a patress - both to hide the holes needed in the plasterboard, and to hide the depth of the bracket. But I think that's probbaly the best idea so far.
 
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