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Installing security alarm panel in loft

Discussion in 'Alarms, CCTV & Telephones' started by HenryGregory, 7 Apr 2019.

  1. HenryGregory

    HenryGregory

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    Hi guys,
    I am buying a Texecom alarm system for my house.
    In my downstairs cupboard, I have a fused spur just for the burglar alarm, but I am thinking of putting the control panel up in the loft. It is a wireless system so the keypads, bell box and PIRs do not need to be wired in.

    The box is quite bulky and I have all of the space I could dream of up in the loft and a power supply coming in. Also with it being wireless, it should get a better signal being higher up as each wireless unit, talks to the next.

    I don't have a fused spur up in the loft and I note from the instruction manual for the panel:
    "An appropriate and readily accessible disconnection device (e.g. an switched fused spur) must be provided as part of the installation".

    The loft has it's own fuse in the consumer. This fuse operates the double socket. Which currently has a TV amplifier connected into it.

    The security alarm control box also has an internet connector box so I can control it from my phone. I am going to need two plugs so was thinking of mounting the unit on a wooden board on the wall and running a single plug from the double in the loft to a new double on the wooden board. Something like this..

    [​IMG]

    Can anyone give me some advice on if this would be a good method?
     
  2. PASUK

    PASUK

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    Hi:

    I'm by no means an expert but have done a few texecom wired and wireless systems so I'll do my best to provide some considerations...

    How's your loft fitted out and what's the temperatures like in winter and summer?

    If it's anything like mine it gets very cold/hot. While the panels are specified to operate over a good range of temps I wonder how the backup battery will cope with the range - I don't know. My other consideration would be about the environment = extra dust and spiders / insects generally with the electronics. My loft simply gets too many bugs and dust and wouldn't do any good to the pcb and components.

    In terms of the wireless signal you are correct in that each wireless unit talks to the next in a mesh network. I tend to prefer attempting to put the panel within one step of a few wireless devices so that you have a few different ways the data gets to and from the panel from devices further away, in which case the loft may /may-not be ideal. You can tell by firing up wintex monitor on the laptop and see how the devices map onto the system.

    Power supply. I've only ever used switched fuse spur as the means to connect. I think using your approach technically works but it's not standard. I guess there is a concern someone could simply unplug the alarm if they were generally on a plug but you're suggesting putting it in the loft so that shouldn't be likely. Nevertheless I'd recommend the fused spur if possible to keep to standards.

    Internet connector box? Is that SmartCom ?
    If so and if using WiFi I don't believe this will bounce through your mesh network of alarm devices, you'll need to make sure you are within good range of your internet access point direct! Watch out for that if you are installing in the loft if your AP is a couple of floors below.

    Hope this helps in some way
     
    Last edited: 7 Apr 2019
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  3. mattylad

    mattylad

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    You can test your wifi connection by just placing the control box in the loft and plugging it in.
     
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  4. Sally2000

    Sally2000

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    When the outside temperature went up to 30c a couple of years ago our loft max was 42c. Without any forced air ventilation the inside of an alarm box would be even higher from its own heat generation.
     
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  5. HenryGregory

    HenryGregory

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    Thanks ever so much for taking the time to post. Yes, the internet connector is a Smart Com. I had not really thought about heat in the loft. Internet is not an issue as I actually have an AP up in the loft. But yes, heat could be an issue. Maybe I should just use the fused spur in the cupboard then. It is just annoying as the control box for the intruder alarm is quite big! My cupboard space is at a premium! Thanks again for your helpful post.

    I am good for wifi, forgot to mention in my OP, I have wireless in the loft. But as PASUK has mentioned, heat could be an issue up there. Annoying as I was also planning on housing my CCTV DVR up in the loft.

    Very good point, but this heat issue has scuppered my plans! I don't remember the loft being really, really hot in the summer, but as this is a new property, I have not been in long enough to know. I might have to go with plan b and put it all in the cupboard where there is a purpose installed fused spur just for an intruder alarm.
     
  6. Sally2000

    Sally2000

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    Let me tell you what I did when I put the cctv DVR in the loft, after I realised how hot it would be.
    I mounted the DVR vertically on a wall, with its lid off and its tiny internal fan disconnected. In front of it I hung a panel with a large computer fan and a thermostat with a reverse contact. It's set to turn the fan on above 15c. Below that no cooling is needed, and its own dissipation keeps it comfortably warm even in freezing temperatures.
    This might not be a good idea in a very old dusty loft, but in our 1950's semi the loft is actually quite clean.
     
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