Internal stud wall to external standards and fixing of top plate

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by OldKettle, 24 Sep 2020.

  1. OldKettle

    OldKettle

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    Hi,
    I am looking at building a stud wall, with an door, in a porch area, which sits between the house and a brick outbuilding.

    The porch is brick on three sides (external house wall, external outbuilding wall, and enclosed by a rear wall.) There is a single continuous flat roof that runs above the outbuilding and the porch.

    The porch is therefore a fully enclosed, solid structure, apart from a double glazed, aluminium sliding door at one end, onto the garden. All of the walls are cavity walls with blown in insulation and, according to the original plans the roof has a U value of 0.25

    I would like to build an internal stud wall, with an external grade wooden door, to sit a couple of feet behind the existing aluminium door. I'd like this for three reasons (in descending order)

    1) To add a further level of security to the entrance
    2) To improve the insulation
    3) To enable the aluminium door to be removed for repair at some point

    Although it is an internal wall, I would like to build it to the same standard as an external wall, to provide a proper degree of security (i.e. withstand a forced entry) and be protected against short term exposure to the elements.

    From looking at the original plans it seems that the construction of the flat roof included asbestos, and as far as I know it still does. I therefore want to avoid having to locate the joists and damaging the existing ceiling.

    My plan for doing so it to use joist hangers to run a 2x6 joist across the ceiling, and then attach the top plate of stud wall to that joist. Because the ceiling doesn't match the top of a course of bricks, I intended to bolt short pieces of 2x6, flat to the wall both sides, then attached timber to timber joist hangers to those pieces and run the joist between them. Below is a top plan view of this idea.

    I do have some concerns, and I am hoping that you may be able to provide some advice. The issues are:

    1) Is the plan for running a joist from hangers a reasonable idea to create a top plate fixing point? Would it be strong enough (with regards to forced entry)? Is there a better way? Do I need to bother with the timber pieces flat to the wall, or could I just bolt a flat joist hanger, like the one below, direct to the wall?

    [​IMG]

    2) I had a plan to use 2x6 for extra strength, but I have a bunch of 2x4 left over. I think that they would be sufficient, but wonder whether 2x6 would make a significant difference in terms of forced entry (by reducing flex in the frame if it is forced).

    Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. foxhole

    foxhole

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    You don’t need any larger than 4x2 for stud wall , thief’s don’t demolish walls but if it’s just plasterboard they can go thru it . Just line one wall with osb under the plasterboard.
     
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  4. OldKettle

    OldKettle

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    Many thanks FoxHole.

    My concern was really with the timber flexing with either a kick in attempt, or an attempt to jemmy it.

    I'll be adding london/birmingham bars to either side, which should prevent the locks/hinges being kicked through the frame, so I think it is really only on issue of whether the timber could flex so much to compromise the door.

    do you have any thought on the fixing of the joist across the ceiling?
     
  5. foxhole

    foxhole

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    You can double up the frame timbers but not really required .Just screw thru top plate to ceiling timbers .
     
  6. DIYnot Local

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