Is this amount of condensation right for new sash windows?

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No, not yet, just finished the installation last week. But I was told that Fensa can just sign it off without a visit, or they might visit to inspect.
So the installer is Fensa registered ?

In which case he better pray that you don't get an inspection, as without trickle vents ( or ventilation as mentioned earlier ) , that should fail a Fensa inspection as it won't conform to the new Jun 15 2022 building regulations
 
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No, not yet, just finished the installation last week. But I was told that Fensa can just sign it off without a visit, or they might visit to inspect.

Fensa and Certass are just self certification schemes, after jumping through hoops to become accredited they trust you that your installations meet current building regs and allow the installer to sign the installation off as compliant, Fensa or Certass can and will come out on random jobs to inspect afterwards, however if a particular installer has previous history of non compliance then for sure they'll be kept an eye on, depending on the severity they could even lose their accreditation
 
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Fensa and Certass are just self certification schemes, after jumping through hoops to become accredited they trust you that your installations meet current building regs and allow the installer to sign the installation off as compliant, Fensa or Certass can and will come out on random jobs to inspect afterwards, however if a particular installer has previous history of non compliance then for sure they'll be kept an eye on, depending on the severity they could even lose their accreditation
That's what I was told too by the joiner. He sounded confident that it wouldn't happen though! I guess I'll have to wait a couple of weeks and see what happens.
 
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Do you think that's a practical long term solution? Or are you just trolling?
Why isn't it a practical long term solution? I used to play sports in a unventilated hall, we had to extract all the moisture in the air using a dehumidifier and it improved the usability of the hall. In a room, a smaller and quieter machine can be used. It may not remove the window condensation completely, but could half or quarter the problem. If the problem only happens at night, a socket timer could be used to automate the on/off.

Do you see all solutions unfamiliar to you to be trolling?
 
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I suppose you are a Nut job so you would see that as a long term solution. Please accept my apologies and hope you are able to get the help you need.
 
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Why isn't it a practical long term solution? I used to play sports in a unventilated hall, we had to extract all the moisture in the air using a dehumidifier and it improved the usability of the hall. In a room, a smaller and quieter machine can be used. It may not remove the window condensation completely, but could half or quarter the problem. If the problem only happens at night, a socket timer could be used to automate the on/off.

Do you see all solutions unfamiliar to you to be trolling?
I used to have a dehumidifier many years ago. I can't say I loved it as it's bulky and noisy, and expensive to run. I wouldn't want a humming in the middle of the night!
 
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I used to have a dehumidifier many years ago. I can't say I loved it as it's bulky and noisy, and expensive to run. I wouldn't want a humming in the middle of the night!
The white noise will mask the other noises you are trying to block. Sometimes, the best solution will pinch you on the cheeks until you realise it.

Years ago is not same as now. Now, we are using modern china tech. Things may look same on the surface, underneath it's different.
 
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Electromagnetic based solution would mean silence. I have no experience of it or know if or how exactly it works. It should work on principle. It will use electricity to create a cold piece of metal that condenses. I imagine it would have a fan to cool the hot side of the metal. Fan noise is likely quieter than pump noise. The 4 fans in my PC are quiet enough for my oversensitive ears.

 
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From the description in the Amazon link above "It can remove up to 450 ml of water per day at 30 ℃ and 80% RH."

Who heats their house to 30 ℃? What can it remove overnight when sleeping at perhaps 18 ℃? Removing 450ml in 24 hours is only 150ml in 8 hours at 30 ℃ so we can be pretty sure that is is going to remove next to no moisture overnight at normal bedroom temperatures.
 
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No way to know until some one try and report. Shopping site comments are not always reliable because of competitors and stooges.

Doesn't look like 450ml on the OP's window. 10ml, perhaps. But, I am cr*p at estimating distances, volumes and measurements. Higher temperature air transports greater amount of moisture. The amount, I expect, is proportional. Lower temperature doesn't mean no moisture content.
 

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