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Jigsaw advice

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by Keith650, 5 Oct 2020.

  1. Keith650

    Keith650

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    Good morning,
    Can anyone recommend a good jigsaw (and blades) for cutting holes for hob and sink in 40mm laminate-on-chipboard worktop. Bear in mind this is a one-off job so I don’t really want to be spending a ton of money on something I may never use again.
    Thank you.
     
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  3. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    In that case cut the corners using a hole saw in a drill for the corners (if round corners are OK) then do the straight cuts from the underside using circular saw with a fine tooth blade OR do the straight cuts from the underside with the circular saw as above, flip the worktop over and carefully saw the corners out from the top using a brand new reasonable quality fine tooth (9 or 10pt) hard point crosscut saw (something like a Bahco Barracuda 244+).

    The problem with using jigsaws to cut thick materials is that they rarely cut square (the blades tend to flex, especially those crappy T101BR downcut blades so often, and mistakenly, recommended for this task). Even the industrial models are rarely brilliant (there are exceptions - the Festool Carvex is OK-ish, whilst the Mafell, P1cc is exceptional when combined with their extra thick W1 blade, but so it should be at circa £500 for the saw and £30-odd for the blade). Jigsaws all work better if used with an upcut (standard) blade from the underside of the material, but as soon as you go round a cornwr with a jigsaw blade it takes on set to one side and will no longer cut square, so if you do get a jigsaw, drill out the corners or use square corners to avoid messing up your blade
     
    Last edited: 6 Oct 2020
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Use the special blades for cutting on the down stroke, and then you don't have to mess about turning the top over.

    Plunge cut with a circular

    Stitch drill enough to then cut it with a hand saw
     
  5. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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