Lanlord contract gone pearshaped.

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If he was following his contract he should only have £900 left to pay on the £3000 job. Instead he chose the remain with our terms and go for keeping back £1500.....Ummmm, when it suits him ey, This could be his downfall i think.
 
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TheWife said:
Thx Softus....the first reassuring news weve had.

Ultimately, I suspect that this guys antics could mean our business winds up.....loss of earnings for a month is going to devastate us and persuing will also be as costly if we lose. But hey, when you look it that way.....were already in the s***t financially, so why not go out with a humdinger of a battle.
I`m genuinely sorry to read that....but , bearing in mind the new law on Bankruptcy, and the lessening of the stigma attached.I would seriously consider filing for bankruptcy..Let the dust settle and then your husband could get a job as a hotel maintenance guy for example, while you give yourselves time to re think and move on
 
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sorry to hear you had these problems

this is one reason why i dont work for landlords now

i personally am owed 4700 from multiple landlords all of them are hiding from me now

i know on lad who worked for 1 month for multiple landlords on the pretext he would be paid in full ( no idea why he fell for it ) no cash came his way

there is a hardcore bunch that fleece tradesmen there names are well know in some circles,they tell lies to get away without paying

your not alone on this road gl on it

ps use the law to get what you want but FIRST record your conversation with the landlord ,if your clever and sneaky you will get him to say just about anything you want to hear
 
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david and not julie said:
IT IS ESSENTIAL your solicitor does this and not you, the court will recognise and respect his view over yours. The landlord could throw your letter in the bin and deny all knowledge, whereas a court would believe your solicitor.
Do you realise that a court is duty bound to assume that the sender of a letter is telling the truth, unless there is evidence or an indication to the contrary? What grounds do you have for believing what you're writing here, let alone publishing it?
 
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Softus said:
david and not julie said:
IT IS ESSENTIAL your solicitor does this and not you, the court will recognise and respect his view over yours. The landlord could throw your letter in the bin and deny all knowledge, whereas a court would believe your solicitor.
Do you realise that a court is duty bound to assume that the sender of a letter is telling the truth, unless there is evidence or an indication to the contrary? What grounds do you have for believing what you're writing here, let alone publishing it?

Hi....I think david & julie are just making sure I dot my eyes and cross my t's. I believe that a legal letter would be more difficult to ignore.
 
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TheWife said:
Softus said:
david and not julie said:
IT IS ESSENTIAL your solicitor does this and not you, the court will recognise and respect his view over yours. The landlord could throw your letter in the bin and deny all knowledge, whereas a court would believe your solicitor.
Do you realise that a court is duty bound to assume that the sender of a letter is telling the truth, unless there is evidence or an indication to the contrary? What grounds do you have for believing what you're writing here, let alone publishing it?

Hi....I think david & julie are just making sure I dot my eyes and cross my t's. I believe that a legal letter would be more difficult to ignore.
You must do what you're comfortable with, but don't be misled - whilst your contractor might take more notice of a letter from your solicitor, it means nothing extra to the court.

If you can write clearly, without getting emotional, and can stick to the facts and avoid berating him, then you can do just as good a job and much more cheaply.
 
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Softus said:
david and not julie said:
IT IS ESSENTIAL your solicitor does this and not you, the court will recognise and respect his view over yours. The landlord could throw your letter in the bin and deny all knowledge, whereas a court would believe your solicitor.
Do you realise that a court is duty bound to assume that the sender of a letter is telling the truth, unless there is evidence or an indication to the contrary? What grounds do you have for believing what you're writing here, let alone publishing it?

My grounds are pretty straightforward really. We have someone asking questions about a legal matter, so I have told them to see a solicitor.

I am basing my reply on over 20 years experience of running my own business and several similar issues.

What grounds do you have for your comment and why am I wrong to advise the seeking of legal representation?
 
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It's one thing to advise someone to seek professional legal advice, but my question was meant to be directed at the following set of comments, all of which went beyond the simple redirection towards a solicitor that you've now dropped back to...

david + julie - julie said:
I would be very careful on this one...

david and said:
IT IS ESSENTIAL your solicitor does this and not you, the court will recognise and respect his view over yours.

david and julie said:
The landlord could throw your letter in the bin and deny all knowledge, whereas a court would believe your solicitor.

So, to answer your question, viz:

david (but no julie) said:
What grounds do you have for your comment and why am I wrong to advise the seeking of legal representation?
My grounds are that you overstepped the simple act of stating facts and recommending legal advice. I never said that you were wrong to advise seeking legal representation. I sincerely hope that The Wife does that, because she'll then discover that you were stating opinion, not facts.
 
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What I will do Monday...

1.Contact HSE Monday AM.
2.Upload and go through all pictures taken (I managed to get snaps of his electrics too).
3.Call Fairtrades legal contact back.
4.Visit the CAB.

Tuesday....

1.Pay a visit to his other flat and speak to the other flat owner who he currently is having a dispute with (The other flat owner is a builder too).
2.He also told me he contacted his solictor about another plumbing company. So may do some digging their to see if anything happened.
 
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OK....Its Saturday...He's left 4 msg for me to call.
Come Monday I will have to have contacted him or be able to answer my phone. He is asking me to meet with him.

Whats the best stance so I dont antagonize him. But can be left until I am legally armed to deal with him?

I CAN SEE WHY NOT MANY WOMEN ARE IN THIS BUSINESS.
 
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do you really want to go down the road of the HSE i know for sure there will be retributions made towards you as i have been down that road

i was labelled a grass by more a lot of gas fitters when i riddored someone ( report to hse )

think hard on it as long as you get your cash your ok leave the reporting to those that can stomach the problems it brings

ask anyone on here if they are comfortable reporting to the HSE :eek:
 
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I am not grassing. He is not looking out for my best interests or others. He was advised to contact HSE for guidance by me. I informed him I have a duty of care to uphold. I. He knows I have forwarded details to Fairtrades.

Ultimately, without a shadow of a doubt Id protect others. My business it to ensure that I have the clients interest at heart. And it is in his interest to get it right.

If thats a grass then TOUGH LOVE, Im looking out for other tradesman, the people that rent or buy that property, visitors children, clearly he is disregarding his responsibility if he does make sure it is safe.

SORRY BUT I FEEL STRONGLY ABOUT THE SAFETY ASPECT AND ITS MY REPUTATION ON THE LINE HERE, HE WILL NOT DRAG ME DOWN TO HIS LEVEL.
 
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dont be corralled by him until you have got a game plan in place and are armed with the appropriate advice.
 
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I am currently working on forging an alliance with landlords associations.
I have also started a poll to list landlords by county and for tradesmen to rate them if they have done work for them.

That info will be made available to the associations. Ultimately identifying those that you do not recommend.

Providing guidance on what to look out for...

Ensuring you only deal with those that are part of an association. Checking out that associations accountability....

So my service will make things better for all but its unfortunate that we have to experience it too.
 
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I dont think that we should have an untrusting relationship.

Tradesmen get vetted all the time, so lets turn it on its head and have the landlords vetted to.

Only going for landlords that can be accountable to an association is possibly the way forward.
 
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