1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Middle Property double extension and double garage help

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Jackmc88, 13 Jun 2018.

  1. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello,

    Q1. I have just purchased a 2 bed middle property (images below) very rural with two neighbours with the intention of renovating. I’m just in the process of drawing up some plans for an extension. Currently the house has a small extension for the bathroom (next to the kitchen) I want to knock this down and apply for a double storey extension (same as one of the end neighbours) does anyone see am immediate issue with the sketches? As I want to put the bathroom upstairs and extend the kitchen and living area downstairs.

    Q2. I would also want to build a detached double garage at the end of the land that comes with the house. I don’t see this being a massive issue but what Iv read I can have 30m^2 without planning?? Is this correct? Next concern the neighbours living room window looks directly out on to my garden and the garage would be in view but about 15 meters away? Would this also be an issue?

    Thank you in advance.
    Jack

    46F00ADF-DE87-46F8-B8E6-D71DB2C2B66D.jpeg 421AAC1A-0A83-4D5E-991F-94248A4E282A.jpeg 093AE5D0-FFCE-4219-B929-19EC240414BB.jpeg 68EC5C6E-CE72-4BA5-8927-1BE7B4209A5E.jpeg 5B1AEEDF-0528-4E60-BBB4-C4BA1958BE24.jpeg B1FEF930-71AE-47E7-A8F4-3E6BF9CC9F3B.jpeg A2BB531A-0536-43F6-A272-402217985177.jpeg
     
  2. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  3. ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    23,844
    Thanks Received:
    2,880
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You need to read your council's local planning policy. That will tell you what you can and can't do at that location. That extension will need planning permission. Barring any actual policy preventing it, it will be a subjective opinion as to whether it fits in with the character of the locality.

    Read up on permitted development - which will tell you what things you might be able to do without applying for formal planning permisison - this will relate to the garage

    The 30m2 you referred to rlates to building regulations not planning permisison.
     
  4. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thank you Woody,

    I have read my local planning policy (House is in Melling, Carnfoth, Lancashire) and they give very little guidance and direct you to the planning portal, also checked if there was any permitted development rights which there isn't that I can see about the garage. I cant see anything being an issue from that side it was just going up to my neighbours low level window. The style of build will be matched to the original structure and seeing the neighbour has an extension I don't think that would prevent anything thing either?

    Would it be a safe options to sketch up some plans with the double garage and provide them on the same plans and issue these via the planning portal and discuss this with the neighbours first?

    Thanks
     
  5. BIGbadmarky

    Joined:
    5 Feb 2018
    Messages:
    13
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Country:
    United Kingdom
  6. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thank you, that does help.
     
  7. ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    23,844
    Thanks Received:
    2,880
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    All council's should have specific local guidance distinct from the national general guides. It's often termed as "supplementary" or "Home Extension" guidance.

    It's important as it will contain specific requirements.

    The garage will come under permitted development. So keep to the height constraints and that will be fine.

    An existing neighbouring extension is no guarantee that another similar one will be acceptable. Especially one as awful as that existing thing.
     
  8. noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    31,146
    Thanks Received:
    1,965
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    It was early in my career and I was skint.
     
  9. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    thank you guys,

    Does anyone foresee an issue with the neighbours window? I have noted it on the image attached.

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  10. ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    23,844
    Thanks Received:
    2,880
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    That's why you need to look at the council's local policy.

    They may well implement the 45° rule wich will determine how far out any extension can be built.
     
  11. ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    23,844
    Thanks Received:
    2,880
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Don't come here with any excuses. Its not acceptable under any circumstances - you've not even fitted the downpipe to that outlet!:mad:
     
  12. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Front this section from the Lancaster City Council, Householder design guide...:(

    The Council uses the '45-degree rule' to help assess impact upon the amenities of the neighbouring dwelling(s) and to protect from overshadowing or obstruction caused by large extensions on or close to the boundary. When assessing the impact of the proposal there will be 2 key issues relating to the affected property that would need to be considered:

    1. The use of the affected room (e.g. non-habitable rooms are not as important in terms of the impact of daylight and sunlight); and
    2. Whether the affected window is the primary light source for that room. If the room has other unaffected windows, depending on their size and orientation, these may serve the room with adequate natural light.
     
  13. Jackmc88

    Joined:
    13 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    10
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    C2. Rear Extensions.

    Rear Extensions When designing a rear extension there are a number of key principles to consider:  The relationship between the extension and windows serving habitable rooms on the adjoining or adjacent neighbouring dwelling must be respected (45 degree rule4 )  The rear extension should not have such a significant footprint that an inadequate amount of outdoor private amenity space is retained  2 storey rear extensions should not have first floor windows that can directly overlook any adjoining garden or into a habitable room of a neighbouring property (i.e. they should be fitted with fixed obscure glazing or be sufficiently separated from boundaries or neighbouring windows, though no obscure glazing should be applied to a habitable room’s principal window)  2 storey rear extensions should be capped with a pitched/hipped roof to match existing dwelling
     
Loading...

Share This Page