1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Moving an aerial point

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by Geoff-88, 1 Nov 2018.

  1. Geoff-88

    Geoff-88

    Joined:
    2 May 2018
    Messages:
    37
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hi

    We're in the process of renovating our bedroom and have decided to wall mount our TV.

    There's an existing aerial point on the same wall as the proposed TV point and is not too far away.

    The wall thankfully is hollow. If I get a new single aerial box and cut it into the wall at the new point, can I just link off the old one with some cable?

    The plan should the room ever change, is to keep the original aerial point in situ.

    I'm just confused as to how to extend it. There's no slack on the cable what so ever.

    I don't know if joining it up onto the other one is the correct way to do it.

    I've researched a dual aerial point but it says it's for 2 separate inputs not to ''loop".

    What are my options?
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. jj4091

    jj4091

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    4,559
    Thanks Received:
    383
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Use inline coax connectors to join the cable.
     
  4. Geoff-88

    Geoff-88

    Joined:
    2 May 2018
    Messages:
    37
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    But that makes the existing aerial point useless doesn't it?
     
  5. SFK

    SFK

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    1,214
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Geoff,
    "using a inline connector makes the existing aerial point useless doesn't it?"

    Yes, but it is for the best as you get the best signal down the cable to the newly positioned TV.
    If you put a Y splitter there, it will halve the signal in the cable to each socket and TV, and perhaps degrade the picture on your TV.

    Put a blanking plate over the old socket to cover the join, and then simply to reuse if you need it in future.
    SFK
     
  6. Geoff-88

    Geoff-88

    Joined:
    2 May 2018
    Messages:
    37
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Ok thanks.

    I can't find an appropriate 'inline connector' from a search. Could you kindly post a link of what I need.

    I might have a spare blanking plate lying around but no connectors of sorts.
     
  7. SFK

    SFK

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    1,214
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Sure,
    For best connection you need "F type connectors"
    So From this page
    https://www.screwfix.com/c/electrical-lighting/lead-connectors/cat830560
    for best quality connection you need this (This is good price)
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/philex-coaxial-f-plug-pack-of-10/17061
    and this (this seems a bit expensive)
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-f-plug-to-f-plugs-pack-of-10/95730
    Sorry that they are both 10 packs!

    Note that they are dependent on cable diameter being correct. Most of the time normal TV cable fits, but some TV cable is thinner.

    You can get single "F type connectors" from ebay, and they sometimes have them in B&Q and wickes (costing a bit more).
    https://www.wickes.co.uk/Ross-F-Type-Satellite-Connector/p/160888
    https://www.wickes.co.uk/Ross-F-Type-Satellite-Couplers/p/160903

    Or for lower quality connection you use these:
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-metal-coax-plugs-pack-of-10/78603
    and
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-plastic-coax-couplers-pack-of-10/26904

    SFK
     
    Last edited: 1 Nov 2018
  8. SFK

    SFK

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    1,214
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    And here are instructions for fitting an F type connector (I use a knife):
     
  9. Geoff-88

    Geoff-88

    Joined:
    2 May 2018
    Messages:
    37
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for the links. Just as a thought, could you not do away with the connectors and just simply double the coaxes up and put the shroud twisted together in one connector block and the inner core in another?

    Reason being, I'm just wondering how I'm going to manage to fit the connectors ect in the back box. Seems like a tight fit and not much room for error.

    Just been looking in garage to see if I can find some of them connectors btw but no joy.

    What I do seem to have in abundance is the electrical insulated connector block.

    If the above will not suffice. Can I just confirm I need to join the 2 pieces of coax in the back box with the middle section as follows:

    1. One of these on either end:

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/philex-c...l+Content&utm_content=TextLink&utm_term=58258


    2. One of these to join the 2 together:


    https://www.screwfix.com/p/labgear-...l+Content&utm_content=TextLink&utm_term=58258

    Thanks
     
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

    Joined:
    3 Nov 2006
    Messages:
    22,104
    Thanks Received:
    2,048
    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You could fit one of those to replace the existing single socket, Then wire the existing coax cable to one socket. Wire new coax cable to the second socket. The other end of this new cable goes to the single socket fitted at the location for the TV. A short length of coax and two plugs to make a jumper linking the two sockets on the new dual aerial point
     
  12. Geoff-88

    Geoff-88

    Joined:
    2 May 2018
    Messages:
    37
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Are you suggesting this be done externally, hence plugs?

    That would look awful!
     
  13. jj4091

    jj4091

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    4,559
    Thanks Received:
    383
    Location:
    Cumbria
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Your first solution will cause problems in the future if not immediately, your second solution will be ok.
     
  14. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

    Joined:
    3 Nov 2006
    Messages:
    22,104
    Thanks Received:
    2,048
    Location:
    Bedfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I agree that visually it is not good but it does work as a quick fix that retains the original socket should you decide to change the room layout again.
     
  15. Geoff-88

    Geoff-88

    Joined:
    2 May 2018
    Messages:
    37
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I appreciate your suggestion however, this won't be a quick fix. I couldn't in all honesty live with seeing a link wire in an open space. As I understand it now, the connector block method won't work either.

    Can I just confirm if I go down the F type connector route as originally suggested by SFK, this will be my best option?

    Is this entirely dependant on the cable diameter? Should I get some standard coax plug ends just in case?

    I'm still unsure how I'm going to achieve this in the back box housing. I will have to bend the wire around without putting any stress on the connections.

    I can get a blanking module from B&Q I could certainly live with that rather than filling the hole.
     
  16. foxhole

    foxhole

    Joined:
    14 Mar 2006
    Messages:
    14,718
    Thanks Received:
    1,573
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    With hollow wall getting the connectors in should be easy as any bends can be looped in the wall not the junction box.Remove the back box and make joint behind .
     
  17. SFK

    SFK

    Joined:
    23 Jul 2010
    Messages:
    1,214
    Thanks Received:
    282
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Geoff,
    INLINE
    1) Although the length of wire coming into your wall box is short, the F type connectors are simple to fit in small spaces, and simple to remove later. Plus, I bet that you will not need to modify the cable end that you remove from the back of the socket, as normally to put the cable into the back of the socket it has to have been prepared in the same manner as needed to go into a F type plug. So I would expect you to remove cable from socket and screw F type connector straight onto cable.

    1.2) Also F type connectors do not have much worry with Stress being put upon them by tight bends (although best not to, not an issue in this case - and remember that I bet you have a worse (tighter) curve of cable going into the back of the socket you have now.

    1.1) And saying that, you have a hollow wall so this might not be an issue. When you prepare your new cable you can have lots of slack and then push this slack back into the wall for use later.

    LOOP
    2) Your idea of a dual socket with a look cable on front is okay (in my opinion) if:
    - it is behind cupboard etc so cannot be see or loop accidentally removed.
    - You have a need to use the lower socket occasionally.
    - the extra losses of 2 connectors does not damage your TV signal (not an issue if strong enough).
    - Note that some F type dual sockets are simply F type inline-connectors, so you still have to terminate both your cables with F type connectors
    - I think this is a good dual socket as it minimizes stress on cables and will make loop look a bit better.
    https://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Produc...MI08f438C13gIVo7DtCh3BYgCCEAQYCCABEgLv0PD_BwE

    3) Sorry to add this, but are you sure your wall is hollow ALL the way between the two connections? I ask as many walls have nogins in them which are lengths of wood left to right in the stud wall to make wall stronger. In my experience these are always in the wrong place. Oping image here gives and idea of what many stud walls look like (yours might be dot and dab).


    SFK
     
Sponsored Links
Loading...

Share This Page