My first DIY project in my life: replacing carpet with laminate flooring

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I am working on my first DIY project to replace carpet with laminate flooring in a first-floor room in a victorian terrace house. I have removed the carpet and the underlay.

1) There are many nails and staples on the wooden subfloor, should I remove them all?
2) Is there anything I should do before putting on the new underlay and laminate on it?

Included some photos of the subfloor.

Many thanks
 

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JP_

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Marry Christmas and Welcome!

Probably best to just try to whack the nails flat with a lump hammer. But might be worth checking out the floor/joists below that rotten looking area. Is the ground solid there? Looks like it was replaced once before. Maybe a leak below? Or maybe me worrying too much! (bad experiences with old floors!)
 
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Merry Christmas! Thank you so much, JP. thanks for the advice! I will check if it is leaking there! Better be cautious as I don't want to do it again if it in fact leaking :)

Could you recommend what underlay should be used as the sub floor is a bit not even? Thanks!
 
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If it is leaking in the rotten area, I should see some sign on the ceiling of the floor below, right? can't find any leaking sign downstair.

What are those dark stains on this pic? Are these rotten area? The ground is solid is this area
 

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JP_

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maybe something else then, like old glue or something?
 
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laminate will be cold underfoot and even with any loose flooring well nailed down will be very noisy

i assume this is a private house rather than a flat conversion as laminate/uncarpeted wooden floors are not often allowed because off noise and will be in the lease
 
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Most laminates have 2mm tolerance. That floor is going to take a lot of prepping, I would consider over boarding with plywood first, it might be simpler.
 
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Buy a multitool, start at the doorway, decide whether you're going under the skirting or using beading, lay perpendicular to the existing boards, well staggered, don't skimp on the expansion gaps or the quality of underlay and laminate.
Assess the entire floor, looks like small bits have been badly replaced by plumbers etc so if the majority is ok you could just sort these areas to avoid overboarding (which can cause issues with finish floor height) - it may sound like a bodge but in-filling generally works quite well - if a bit of patching timber is 2mm low then nail something 2mm thick on top - anything solid will do, cut up an old 5 litre tub, plastic storage box etc.
Where the bits of board appear to sink at one end, the plumber will have cut through the board at the edge of the joist and nailed a piece of scrap wood to the side of the joist to support the board - probably loose and too low - easily sorted. Finally, go over the entire floor and hammer all the nails down again. If you don't own a plane and need to trim the bottom of the door the multitool will do it - put something 3mm thick on your new floor first. At a pinch, the multitool will cut the laminate to length if you don't own a jigsaw.
 
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If you use fibre board underlay it helps reduce noise transmission better than foam underlay and also compensates for uneven floors , I would replace that osb in the first pic.
 
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