No equipotential Bonding on Gas Meter

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Hi all ,
Is it mandatory or currently still advisable to have equipontal bonding

I currently don't have a gas meter that is equipotentially bonded.
If I get a smart meter fitted which is outside, would they insist on fitting the earth at the same time, and making a rough job of fitting the earth.? I have neighbours that look aesthetically terrible!! so would prefer fitting it myself

- Should I fit the wire myself, taking my time to make sure it doesn't look bad first, then call them in to fit the smart meter,

- Or.. will they fit the meter and put a sticker on it, advising it gets equipontally bonded?
 
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they will just give you a card saying that the bonding is not present, dont worry about it the amount that arent bonded is probably about 60% of all the jobs i see, nothing to worry about
 
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The main bonding should be connected to the supply pipe at the point of entry to the premises - so, if the meter is outside you will not see it there.

However, some meters have an insulating section in the pipe which means the pipe will not require bonding in the premises.
 
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All equipotential bonding to the meter *outlet* pipework not the inlet pipe.
 
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All equipotential bonding to the meter *outlet* pipework not the inlet pipe.
When the meter is outside, that is how it will be.

When the meter is indoors, that is not electrically a satisfactory place to connect it.

It is the supply pipe which is the Extraneous-conductive-part. although I realise the gas supplier does not want it done like that.
 
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The main bonding should be connected to the supply pipe at the point of entry to the premises - so, if the meter is outside you will not see it there.

However, some meters have an insulating section in the pipe which means the pipe will not require bonding in the premises.

If NG went to change a meter, and the bond was on the inlet, the job would be abandoned, until altered to outlet. Certainly true 3 years ago.
If the meter is external, generally it wil be either in the box or just outside of it. In many installs, the outlet (internally) within 600mm will be concealed, so no good for a bond.
 
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The main bonding should be connected to the supply pipe at the point of entry to the premises - so, if the meter is outside you will not see it there.
.

Gas regs say it should be within 600mm of the outlet of meter, and before the first tee. It should not be connected to the meter inlet
 
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wrong it must be within 600mm of the outlet of the gas meter and before any branch offs
Do you know why?
That is what the regulations say but it is not the ideal place - electrically.


If NG went to change a meter, and the bond was on the inlet, the job would be abandoned, until altered to outlet. Certainly true 3 years ago.
Do they know why?

If the meter is external, generally it wil be either in the box or just outside of it. In many installs, the outlet (internally) within 600mm will be concealed, so no good for a bond.
Nevertheless, what I have said is correct - electrically.

Gas regs say it should be within 600mm of the outlet of meter, and before the first tee. It should not be connected to the meter inlet
Why do they say that? Does anyone know?

It is not the ideal place - electrically.
 
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When changing an internal meter, do you apply your own bonding cable from outlet to inlet pipe?
If it were bonded in the correct place you would not need to.

You should, though, apply such a bonding cable on external meters.
 
H

Hot&Cold

If I get a smart meter fitted which is outside,
thats the question,other questions are off topic. Hopefully an electrician doing works associated with gas meter enclosures will be aware of the introduction of medium pressure gas service pipe installations and the programmed service pipe upgrades to Mp.

:sleep: Technical bulletin 102 (amended 2018) provides the latest guidance for gas operatives. electricians will have their own reference material.

Now days its urged or often company requirements to take a few photos of the work carried out .It forms part of the operatives work record-job sheet for quality control and other reasons :confused:.

H&C :p
 
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When changing an internal meter, do you apply your own bonding cable from outlet to inlet pipe?
If it were bonded in the correct place you would not need to.

You should, though, apply such a bonding cable on external meters.
we carry equipotential bonding clamps that are supposed to be used whenever removing a meter but in reality they seldom leave the van,stupidity I know but that is the reality of it, havent a clue where the 600mm figure was derived from, its just what the regs say, if the bonding was at the inlet to the meter and the meter was then removed,then the bonding would not be effective, there has always been a contradiction between electric regs and gas regs when it comes to bonding, you bring up an interesting question though, if a smart meter installer is fitting both gas and electric meters which regs do they adhere to ?
 
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we carry equipotential bonding clamps that are supposed to be used whenever removing a meter but in reality they seldom leave the van,stupidity I know but that is the reality of it, havent a clue where the 600mm figure was derived from, its just what the regs say, if the bonding was at the inlet to the meter and the meter was then removed,then the bonding would not be effective, there has always been a contradiction between electric regs and gas regs when it comes to bonding, you bring up an interesting question though, if a smart meter installer is fitting both gas and electric meters which regs do they adhere to ?

If they are fitting a GM, they must adhere to the gas regs.

Oddly, I asked one of our works electricians the same question as to why 600mm? he said to was simly so we know where it is. I am not absolutely convinced, but I suppose it does make some sort of sense, along with the idea that it must be visible. Being visible does not change anything, apart from immediately evidential
 
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If they are fitting a GM, they must adhere to the gas regs.

Oddly, I asked one of our works electricians the same question as to why 600mm? he said to was simly so we know where it is. I am not absolutely convinced, but I suppose it does make some sort of sense, along with the idea that it must be visible. Being visible does not change anything, apart from immediately evidential
Yes I was told it was so it was visable too but why 600mm and not another figure who knows ?
 
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