painted ceiling gone wrong

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not sure what caused this,I used no nonsense bare plaster paint for the first coat,then two coats of leyland vinyl matt
 
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Is it the patchiness ?

The Leyland vinyl Matt is pretty awful.

If it's still wet wait for it to dry it usually looks better when dry
 
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thanks for your reply, yes its the patchiness. Which paint would you recommend for ceilings?
 
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Crown or Dulux.

Some people say Johnstone but I've never used it.

Valspar from b & q isn't much kop, Leyland contract is ok for the initial watered down base coat.
 
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I use Dulux Ultra matt for those kind of ceilings. It isn't cheap though.

https://www.duluxdecoratorcentre.co.uk/dulux-trade-ultra-matt

10L will cost £60 to 70.

That said, a bog standard emulsion would be fine if you can maintain a wet edge. I suspect you can't though- additives such as floetrol would help. But at £20+ for the floetrol (1L) it might be more prudent to buy the Ultra Matt.

To date, I have only used Ultra Matt 3 times, like all low sheen finishes- you cant wash the surface. It remains the only white emulsion that I have used that I can touch up without seeing a halo effect.
 
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Looking at the patchiness suggests, to me anyway, there may have been polystyrene tiles or similar up there at one time.
When painting a ceiling, as has been mentioned, you need to keep a wet edge. On a ceiling that large it is going to be quite hard so the best thing to do is feather the edges when you are moving to the next area. This basically means rolling out as far as possible so you don't have a hard edged line that will dry out. The feathered area should look speckled but don't worry as when you come back to that area you simply go over it and overlap onto the painted area where you again finish by feathering. This time, because the area already has a layer of paint, it won't look speckled when it dries.
With any paint, until it dries completely, you may think it is patchy. This is definitely true of emulsions which never seem to dry evenly. When you get up the next morning though it seems as though a pro has popped in overnight and done it for you.
 
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I would pretty well swear by Johnstones - used it dozens of times.
 
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Are you using a 9" roller? Ive had similar results as the roller handle is only on one side of the roller, so the pressure is uneven. 12" roller with a roller frame all the way for me now.... faster coverage and less patchyness

I now usually use Dulux Durable Flat Matt, as it's fairly forgiving.
 
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Thankyou everybody for your advice.
@phatboy yes I used a 9 inch roller, the ceiling is so bumpy which probably made the pressure even worse

@conny thanks for the advice, when i was applying the paint it dried so quickly I couldnt properly spread the paint before parts had dried. If I feather the edges will that make the edge dry faster?
 
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Not sure if you have done this job yet but in answer to your question.
Feathering the edges stops you having a 'hard line' finish. By feathering them you are actually putting on a thinner edge so as you move onto the next section you go over the feather edge so it matches the main area. This helps to prevent obvious stop/starts.
I learnt this lesson from my dad when I was about 14. Mum & Dad had gone to the club one Saturday night and dad was starting decorating on the Sunday. I though I would help by paining the ceiling but halfway across and my arm was aching so I gave up and went to bed. He was not best pleased the following morning but eventually explained why and what I had done wrong.
 
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Its technically called flashing. Its from a number of reasons including - painting drying to quick, over working the paint - dragging, poor quality paint. If you read up Tikkurelia Anti reflex is the good to on this one. Having read and read up on this issue buying quality professional paint works. Def avoiding Dulux.
 
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Some people say Johnstone but I've never used it.
Johnston=Laylands for those who did not know. The same paint under a different brand name.

If you painted across the light not along, the blemished would blend with the ceiling shadows, would not they?
 
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Johnston=Laylands for those who did not know. The same paint under a different brand name.

If you painted across the light not along, the blemished would blend with the ceiling shadows, would not they?

There is different Leyland's, I imagine the op has used the Leyland contract paint which for all intents and purposes imo is crap on anything that isn't a new wall
 

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