Replacing a radiator and valves

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I'm thinking about replacing a rather boring radiator with a "designer" one, just for cosmetic reasons. My question is; can I easily replace it with a slightly smaller one? The pipes are coming up through floor tiles (see picture) and I really don't want to dig those up in order to move them.

I'm hoping that a couple of valve extensions (one each side) will do the job but I was wondering how much play there's likely to be going from radiator to extension to valve. i.e. how much leeway am I going to have when it comes to fitting a new radiator between existing pipes that are a fixed distance apart?

Thanks for any help.
 

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Don't forget its not just the width of radiator you need to consider, but also the distance of the inlet and outlet holes from the wall.
 
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Don't forget its not just the width of radiator you need to consider, but also the distance of the inlet and outlet holes from the wall.
Absolutely! Luckily the radiators I'm replacing are all thicker than the replacements, so it should just be a matter of packing behind the wall supports of the new radiators.
 
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Consider the new rad may output considerably less heat than the existing rad especially as the heat outputs are quoted at an unrealistic delta of 70 degrees..ie. they expect you to run the rad with boiling water.
 
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Consider the new rad may output considerably less heat than the existing rad especially as the heat outputs are quoted at an unrealistic delta of 70 degrees..ie. they expect you to run the rad with boiling water.
Oh yes, I did notice that and have divided their figures by whatever the factor is for changing delta 70 to delta 50, completed about a dozen online BTU calculators and taken an average of the results.
 
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It's not just about outputs but also how it heats the air and therefore the space. Standard K2 (Type 22)radiators run typically @ 90% convection 10% radiation therefore they are very efficient at heating the actual space. Column/tube rads like those, with comparable outputs, can be as low as 20% convection 80% radiation therefore they can be very inefficient at the heating larger spaces and take a lot longer to heat the room.

Just something to keep in mind.
 
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