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Replacing an old imperial radiator that is corroded and leaks

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by paul6294, 13 Jan 2016.

  1. paul6294

    paul6294

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    Hello,

    I have a radiator in my sons bedroom that is old and has actually started to leak through the bottom, which has a small section that is rusted through. I presume it's imperial radiator, since when I measure it, it doesn't seem to be of any standard size. If you check the 'radiator' image, the width of the top is 1075 mm and the height is 780 mm, then on either side there are small parts of the radiator that stick out 40 mm each side (these are part of the radiator itself, they are not screwed in).

    I have watched a few videos on how to replace radiators, it looks like something I could manage myself, however these videos don't take into account that I am replacing an imperial radiator, they are just like for like metric replacements.

    If I replace it with a metric radiator, I understand that I should get one that is smaller than the current radiator, then use a radiator extension valve to make up the difference between the pipes, is this correct? What size radiator should I purchase, bearing in mind that the distance between the centre of the pipes coming out of the floor is 1220 mm and these pipes are not flexible, they are metal and won't bend (as far as I can tell, but they may move, I will only be able to determine this once the old radiator has been removed from the wall).

    So far, all I have done is close the valve on the left side of the radiator, by turning the "tap" in the image 'left-pipe' and this has stopped it from leaking, however of course it has also stopped the radiator getting hot, as well as stopped the radiator in the bathroom getting hot. Regarding removal of the radiator, I know that I also need to isolate the valve on the right side, if you check the images 'right-pipe' and 'right-pipe-top' please could you give advice on how to close this valve. Do I turn the actual top part of the pipe that sticks up above where it joins the radiator, or do I need some kind of tool that goes vertically down into that section of pipe and turns the small square that is inside the top of that section of the valve?

    Once the radiator is isolate and taken off from the wall, I need to put the new one on and this looks fine for me to do, however again, because this is imperial changing to metric (possibly), will the new radiator's thread and fittings go on to the current pipes fittings? I understand that if I can do this, I do not need to drain the entire system to replace the radiator, instead I can isolate just this one radiator and slowly drain it as it's disconnected from the pipes, then install the new one. However, if the new radiator will not fit on to these pipe connectors, then I need to replace everything from the pipes that come out of the floor (ie: the pipe connectors whatever they are called, the valves and the radiator), is this correct? Please could you clarify if a metric radiator will fit without needing to drain the system and replace the pipe connectors?

    If I need to replace everything and it requires draining the system, I would not feel confident enough to do this myself, but I would prefer to be able to do this (otherwise I wouldn't be posting here I would be calling a plumber). So if it is the case that I need to drain the system to replace the pipe connectors and valves and I want to do this myself, am I better off to source a replacement imperial radiator that will fit these connectors? And if so, what size radiator should I get or does the same apply as above, just get something smaller and use the radiator extension valves to take up the slack? And will an imperial radiator definitely fit these connectors?

    I know that there are a lot of questions above and any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Paul
     

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  3. 75pete

    75pete

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    I can see that you have been thinking a lot about this rad. It is an every day problem and if I was you Paul, I would get a plumber in to drain and replace this rad. Have a chat about adding TVR to the rads. This is also a simple job with most rads.
     
  4. Madrab

    Madrab

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    That's an old style lockshield valve and needs a universal key to close it off. Those valves will be imperial too, they'll need to be replaced too. That means you'll need to drain the CH down to the level of that rad. That process is dependent on type - sealed or open vented.

    May be easier just getting someone it to do the job in a oner for you.
     
  5. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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