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Replacing existing electric shower

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by wisdom-17, 29 Nov 2019.

  1. wisdom-17

    wisdom-17

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    Hi all,

    I have a Triton electric shower which was installed by someone else around a decade ago. It stopped working the other day so I opened the front cover to see if there is an obvious cause (I don't have much experience in this area).

    Upon opening, it appears the main problem is the connection between the mains electric cable and the shower has burned/melted (see second pic). I know this is a serious safety issue and a fire risk. As you can see in the first pic, the shower power rating is 7.8-8.5kW.

    I have a few questions to help me decide on what to do next:
    • I'm trying to understand how the burnout/melting happened, is it because a thicker electric cable is required?
    • How can I check what power my electricity supply can hold for the shower? I'd like to upgrade to a higher power shower if my current wiring/fuse can hold it.
    Appreciate any guidance

    IMG_20191129_081713.jpg IMG_20191129_081700.jpg
     
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  3. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    The overheating was caused by a loose connection.
    You will need to cut off the damaged cable and renew the connector block.

    Whether a larger shower can be fitted depends on the cable size and fuse/MCB rating.
     
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  4. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed. I know it's been asked/discussed before, but it seems amazing how commonly it is just the neutral connection - do people perhaps take neutral 'less seriously' when tightening things up?

    Kind Regards, john
     
  5. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    That has often been suggested, although it seems unlikely.

    It does, though, seem to be the only explanation in this case - with the internal wiring side of the connector and terminal screw virtually undamaged.
     
  6. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed, but it's hard to see what else the explanation could be in any case, given that is seems so common for only the neutral to be involved!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  7. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    I had a similar problem, caused by a loosened screw connection in the terminal block of a Mira shower, but it was the Live that was involved.
     
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  9. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Well, I suppose that it has to be the L sometimes :)

    However, as I said, it seems extremely common that when someone reports overheating of just one conductor at its termination (in a switch, socket, shower or whatever) it is just the neutral that is affected. I don't think there is any conceivable electrical explanation for that - hence suggestions like the 'psychological' one I mentioned.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  10. Luckyphil

    Luckyphil

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    Dependant on Cable length from Consumer Unit , wether run surface or in Insulation etc etc , Circuit Breaker size

    your existing Cable looks like 6.0mm T&E ( solid cpc) , you could stretch to maybe a 9.5kw Shower , but that would need a 40amp Breaker, though a 9.5kw shower pulls just over 41amps @ 230v / 39.5 Amps @ 240v

    more info rqd

    Phil
     
  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    It's nearly always the case that "a 9.5 kW shower" means that it draws 9.5 kW (as you say, about 39.6A) at 240V - in which case the current at 230V (which is what matters to the regs) would be about 37.9A (so, at that voltage, it would become about a "8.7 kW shower :) )..

    Kind Regards, John

    Kind Regards
     
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  12. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Not so.

    At 230V it would be 8.7kW and 37.8A

    The resistance of the element is the constant.
     
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  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Too slow :) - albeit I said 37.9A!

    Kind Regards, John
     
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