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Roof advice for Lean To

Discussion in 'Roofing and Guttering' started by JonHeath, 5 Sep 2019.

  1. JonHeath

    JonHeath

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    Hi all,

    I'm looking to build a "lean to" shed at the side of my house. This will actually push into an L shape at the back of my house so both the long wall and end of the "shed" will be in place using the exterior walls of the house.The structure will be about 3.8m long and 1.3m wide.

    I'm looking for advice on what product to use for the roof. As it's a shed primarily I'm not looking for a top class roof finishing, but I would like it to be attractive and on the easier side of installation complexity.

    I was for example looking at something like this https://www.roofingsheets.com/our-products/sheets/tileform-411000-sheets-mica-06mm I liked the idea of big sheets covering the space quickly, but not sure how easy it would be to flash this into the wall.

    Seems like there's a huge range of roofing products out there for this. What would you do?

    Thanks
    Jon
     
  2. Leofric

    Leofric

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    Would you be looking for something that might blend in with the existing roof finish ?
     
  3. JonHeath

    JonHeath

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    Hi,

    I don't think the colour/style needs to be a match of my other roofs, as long as it compliments it. I've posted a picture below of the back of the house. It is that right hand side gap that I want to make into a lean to storage space. The roof will start a foot or two lower than the existing roof and is tucked away

    Thanks
    Jon

    house back.jpg
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Looks like you need to find a fifth different material if it's to complement the other three extensions and house.

    Anyway, whilst you may be calling it a shed, it's no reason for it to look like one, unless it really wont be seen.

    There are many plastic 'tile effect' roof sheets nowadays, and also consider including some twinwall transluscent sheets for daylighting. All these sheets can be slotted in to roofing bars just like a conservatory system.
     
  5. JonHeath

    JonHeath

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    Thanks for the reply Woody. Not sure whether your opening comment is sarcasm or genuine, but thanks for the feedback. I've only done the one extension (the largest one) since living there with the tiles on the main roof being reclaimed to match in, and the tiles on the lower roof extension being the closest match as they needed to be different due to the pitch. Same with the bricks. Difficult to match a 1930's brick, mortar colour/thickness, and brick size. The extension/workshop on the left by the way is an outbuilding, not part of the house.

    Anyway....Are there any particular brands/systems you'd recommend? I've looked at quite a few. Some metal, some plastic. Some have a 'wavy' profile which means tying it into the house seems more tricky. Not sure I want to use the translucent stuff as it's a bit cheap looking. Think I'd rather have the tile effect, and try to let natural light in through the front (I'll also put a light in there). Thanks.
     
  6. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    If cost is important then be a bit wary of roofing sheets- the actual sheets are usually fairly cheap but the accessories can easily push the price per square metre up to 'might as well have tiled it'.
    EDIT Flashing kits are available for most of the wrinkly sheets- they cost a fortune but are neat and easy. Or use lead, nice long overlap (300mm or so) and beat it into shape- tedious, might not look as pretty but surprisingly cost-effective
     
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