Roof diagonal cross bracing

Joined
16 Dec 2018
Messages
204
Reaction score
2
Country
United Kingdom
Hello,

I'm looking to put my house on the market next year but I remember when I bought my house 14 years ago, the survey came back advising that roof bracing was required. I spoke to a roofer at the time and he just said it's new regulations. Consequently, I never worried about it.

Due to a recent leak, I've just had my roof re-felted, battens and tiles replaced. I mentioned my bracing dilemma to the roofer as I'm sure it's going to get flagged again during the new buyer's survey. The roofer couldn't really see why the roof would need bracing as there are already longitudinal binders in place?

I found the following thread https://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/truss-diagonal-bracing.487738/#post-3973041 where it suggests I follow the guidance given here https://www.trada.co.uk/publication...uopitched-trussed-rafter-roofs-for-dwellings/.

I've had a quick look and I'm a little confused to exactly what's required. Do I need to do the diagonal bracing as well as the chevron brace shown in my attachment Bracing.png?

After looking that diagram in the bracing image, it suggests the bracing should go from top to bottom. This can't be achieved on my truss due to the longitudinal binders getting in the way. The guide suggests that a 25mm gap should be left above the longitudinal braces so there is room to fit this diagonal brace. Does this mean I need to move down the longitudinal brace to allow room or would me fitting the diagonal bracing like suggested in my image, 'My Roof.jpeg' be sufficient?

If not I'm guessing moving those longitudinal bracing wouldn't be the end of the world. I just need to know what will be accepted by the building surveyor as I don't want the stress of delays when we come to sell.

Also, Are screws acceptable rather than nails?


Thanks
 

Attachments

  • Bracing.PNG
    Bracing.PNG
    798.5 KB · Views: 28,620
  • Roof.jpg
    Roof.jpg
    375 KB · Views: 1,541
Sponsored Links
If it was mine, I would just notch the longitudinal bracing so I could slide two diagonal bracings through side by side. As long as each were fixed onto two rafters where they passed one another, it should be fine. If you want to panic about it, put a longitudinal one spaning 4 rafters under the existing one. Bracings don't have to be in one piece, just as long there's sufficient overlap (minimum two rafters).
 
….and the diagonal bracing needs to be extended down and fixed to the wall plate.
 
….and the diagonal bracing needs to be extended down and fixed to the wall plate.

That's best practice. When I do my jobs, I fix them to the wall plate. If labour only, the contractors often never bother and don't get pulled by building control.
 
Sponsored Links
Thanks, so just to confirm.... I need to go from middle truss rafter to the bottom through the notched hole in the existing longitudinal binder.

I have 9 trusses, would it be best to have two diagonal spanning from middle to the last one as shown in my photo 'Roof1.jpeg'. or maybe show clearer in 'Truss Bracing.png'.

Not meaning to over complicate this but I just need to know it's been done right or there's no point wasting my time.

Are the chevron braces required? Are screws OK?
 

Attachments

  • Roof1.jpg
    Roof1.jpg
    372 KB · Views: 1,028
  • Truss Bracing.png
    Truss Bracing.png
    96.7 KB · Views: 677
Thanks for confirming on the chevron and screws.

Can somebody confirm that my diagram, 'Truss bracing' is correct?
 
Your plan is incorrect. The idea is to stop the trusses from all falling sideways, so that means in addition to the horizontal bracing a single diagonal brace going from corner to corner (apex to eaves) on the under side of each roof plane and not an X as in your image.

And the diagonals are opposite, so from one apex to the eaves and then from the other apex to the eaves. Eaves means near to the eaves, don't struggle trying to get right down to the eaves. The braces need to be right up against the walls. Braces fixed with two fixings at each truss
 
Your plan is incorrect. The idea is to stop the trusses from all falling sideways, so that means in addition to the horizontal bracing a single diagonal brace going from corner to corner (apex to eaves) on the under side of each roof plane and not an X as in your image.

And the diagonals are opposite, so from one apex to the eaves and then from the other apex to the eaves. Eaves means near to the eaves, don't struggle trying to get right down to the eaves. The braces need to be right up against the walls. Braces fixed with two fixings at each truss

Ah, now I'm really confused. Do you mean like this? If not can somebody post an image to explain as I fear you very helpful bunch will soon despair of me if I get it wrong again :)
 

Attachments

  • 3rd try.png
    3rd try.png
    57.9 KB · Views: 531
Ah, now I'm really confused. Do you mean like this? If not can somebody post an image to explain as I fear you very helpful bunch will soon despair of me if I get it wrong again :)
No, one is the opposite way around
 
How's he gonna reach the plate without struggling in the eaves?
The braces don't need to be fixed to the plate. That would not do anything.

The braces just brace the trusses, and the trusses are secured to the house by other means.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top