Roof valley repair/replacement cost

I am up north and prices are cheaper obviously
Do you need to go up the ladder to price for that work No not if
you have got the experience and you have already told them
that you want a price for a new valley, I can see its 10 coarse of
tiles long so 3 metres.

Yeh fair. Like I say, after a couple of people coming I knew what I needed to ask. So probably that's why nobody else went up. Ignore me on that one then!

Thanks for the advice. Very useful. Still not sure who to go for though!
 
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I'm beginning to think you're a little mad.
You have had three experienced tradesmen on here say that around £500 is the price for fixing the work and now had that confirmed by a quote for £490. The same people some of who work directly in the roofing game tell you it's fine to do that work with a decent tower or that a scaffold would cost about £500 and you are still considering getting a guy to do it for £1550. You seem to think he will do the best job, but I'm beginning to think that he's the chancer and saw you coming.
 
I'm beginning to think you're a little mad.
You have had three experienced tradesmen on here say that around £500 is the price for fixing the work and now had that confirmed by a quote for £490. The same people some of who work directly in the roofing game tell you it's fine to do that work with a decent tower or that a scaffold would cost about £500 and you are still considering getting a guy to do it for £1550. You seem to think he will do the best job, but I'm beginning to think that he's the chancer and saw you coming.

You're probably right!

Anyway, I've gone with the final roofer. I'll report back once it's done!
 
Do you mean the No 3. @ £1550?
Have "on exposure" variations such as timber rot discovery beyond the valley been allowed for or included in the final price?
What code lead?
Debris removed?

Its possible that the panel installers worsened the shaky valley tiles by clambering about on the valley. Take an interest in the progress of the new work. Take photos.
 
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Job done. Went with the 490 guy. And I'm pleased. Gave me some advice about the ridge tiles too - don't need rebedding just yet but will in the next couple of years. And the other valley he took a look at and didn't suggest doing it just yet. It doesn't look too bad right now.

Photo attached of the final job.

(Please tell me it's a good job!)
 

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Perhaps you would care to answer a few questions, other DIY'ers or house holders will be following this thread, and wondering just like me whats actually gone on?

What access was used?
What code lead?
Was the valley stripped to valley boards.
How was the felt replaced?
Were the tiles on either side lifted to allow the lead to be laid?
Was the valley freshly repointed?
How long did the job take?

Something in the last photo doesn't look quite right with the lead and the valley pointing - would it be possible for you to take a couple of more detailed (& clearly focused)snaps?

FWIW: the lower left tile is still cocked.
The gutter angle bracket has been forced down - it will pond & eventually leak.
 
Well, after being patiently given much advice the OP disappears, and doesn't answer a request for a few final questions - pretty much par for the course with so many original posters.

However, perhaps others will look at the final photo & see what looks suspiciously like the valley tiles were left in place, and so were the surrounding field tiles and valley pointing, and the lead has simply been laid over the valley tiles (on some kind of filler perhaps), and edge siliconed to the valley pointing.

My monitor is rubbish for detail but FWIW thats how it looks to me.
 
We have just (yesterday) replaced to wet valleys for dry fellas.

Stripped the valleys out and found that who ever had replaced the original concrete valley tiles with a wet GRP fella (recently) had run the valley felt on TOP of the existing laths and then the GRP valley on top of that. Whilst the valley and the tiles were doing their job, if they had a tile breach then the water would have run down the existing felt, straight under the replacement valley!

We stripped the lot out, battens and all, right back to the rafters. We fixed 18mm ply valley trays between the rafters and flush with tops of the rafters. The ply trays were supported on 25mm roof batten. We re-laid felt up the valley and fitted the GRP dry fellas. We fitted 2m strips of repair membrane and lapped it under the existing felt and onto the edge of the valley and repaired the battens. We re-cut the valley tiles using additional new tiles where necessary.

We are going to fit new gutter, fascias (cap) and soffit. Cost: around £3800 including scaffold and mini skip.

I didn't photograph any of the work but we are back there today and I can take some photos if anyone is interested. This how I do my valleys......
 
I have been watching this thread with interest as shortly I will shortly be requiring my bungalows lead valley replaced, as it leaks after being patched up in the past, especially in respect of the work that should be done and the pricing of such a job.
What is the advantage of replacing wet with dry? At present we have no underfelt/membrane. Would I expect to see whoever replaced the valley to line it with a membrane, with a view that when funds allow, we would be replacing the roof, and a membrane would then be used.
Thank you
 
Guy79,
why not open a new thread with photos of what you have? You would possibly receive more replies on your own thread?
 
Whats with the angle on the diaphragms.
Economy. One cut along the 1200mm end of a plywood sheet produces two trays. Rip off say a 440mm x 1200mm piece then rip it in half at the same angle as the valley (45 degrees) and you produce two trays.

They are big enough to catch both the valley and the loose batten ends that fail to catch a rafter.
 
I have been watching this thread with interest as shortly I will shortly be requiring my bungalows lead valley replaced, as it leaks after being patched up in the past, especially in respect of the work that should be done and the pricing of such a job.
What is the advantage of replacing wet with dry? At present we have no underfelt/membrane. Would I expect to see whoever replaced the valley to line it with a membrane, with a view that when funds allow, we would be replacing the roof, and a membrane would then be used.
Thank you
Start a new thread.(y)
 

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