Single storey large rear extension

hmm... i used the incorrect word in "apply.

Could i technically build rear and side ext (see attached) under permitted.
And then remove the wall between the 2?
 

Attachments

  • Original 2.jpg
    Original 2.jpg
    39.3 KB · Views: 213
Last edited:
Sponsored Links
ignore the above! A gap is required between the 2 "extensions" so wouldn't work!
 
When I put planning permission in, all the neighbours bar one accepted it. One neighbour actually said she didn't want it built and make my life hell about it. There must have been 6-7 complaints into the council, even the council agreed that this neighbour was trouble!
 
The planning dept don't have to accept objections from neighbours as reasons for refusal of permission. It depends whether the complaints/ objections are considered 'valid' in Planning terms.
 
Sponsored Links
53FC3E90-52A5-4CE5-ABE5-B682DFC1070D.jpeg
The dog leg might make it a side extension.
PD has limit of 3m above ground level to eves.

Just picking up on this again.
Ref: The side step at the rear of my property.

Having read over the permitted planning document i can see it notes:
Where the original rear wall of a house is stepped, then each of these walls will form ‘the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse’. In such cases, the limits on extensions apply to any of the rear walls being extended beyond
So taking this into account the step is classed as a "rear wall"
Therefore could I extend to the rear by 8m from the stepped rear wall and then 6.5m from the furthest back rear wall. The 8m would be taken from the shortest rear wall.
Am i correct or am i missing something?
 
Last edited:
But as it is a "rear" extension the width should not come into the equation. Width would matter if it genuinely is "side" extension

Going by page 22 "A wall forming a side elevation of a house will be any wall that cannot be identified as being a front wall or a rear wall"
On my property it is blatantly obvious that the wall in question is a rear wall - surely common sense will be used?

Page 17 "Where the original rear wall of a house is stepped, then each of these walls will form ‘the rear wall of the original dwellinghouse’. In such cases, the limits on extensions apply to any of the rear walls being extended beyond"
The examples used are not very clear. The 2nd example on page 17 fails due to step B coming out 9m - if this was reduced to 6m each step would then fall into permitted criteria, yes?

Another example - https://www.npt.gov.uk/PDF/permitted_development_for_householders_technical_guidance.pdf
Not my council but see page 25 figure 4.13

My example is attached, with diagram facing toward the back of the house.
back wall1.jpg
 
Last edited:
If the rear elevation of your property does not have one continuous flat wall and has walls that step in or step out, under the PD guidance, you have both rear ‘and’ side walls and as such, the PD rules for both rear ‘and’ side extensions would apply.

In that link, that’s the guidance for PD in Wales so unless that is different, although the one I had linked to I was under the impression is UK or at least the guidance in England?

I’m not following your latest diagram as it doesn’t show the complete house. Do you have a photo from the rear?

Where are you located?
 
That document is confusing for those who deal with the National PD guidance a lot as it differs. However, that particular LPA have published that document and their introduction states...

“The Householder Extensions LDO applies to house extensions and alterations which would normally require planning permission but are deemed to be straight forward, low impact and in compliance with the council’s house extensions planning guidance. The LDO does not remove any of the nationally set “Permitted Development” rights but it broadens the range of extensions homeowners can undertake without the need to apply for full planning permission.”

So it therefore relaxes and provides additional flexibility for householder extensions but does not apply to all LPA’s. Does yours have a similar guidance document because if not, you’d have to follow the National guidance.

In that latest diagram, where is the front... to the right?
 
Sorry, just having another look, the front is to the south.

Under a formal Planning application, that would be classed as a rear extension. Under PD, that would be classed as both a side and rear extension with both rules being applied.
 
Sorry, just having another look, the front is to the south.

Under a formal Planning application, that would be classed as a rear extension. Under PD, that would be classed as both a side and rear extension with both rules being applied.


Unfortunately my LPA do not have a specific guide which goes in to much detail - so yes it looks like following the national guidance.
 
My interpretation of the rules that apply to your proposals are...

  • The wider part of the extension should not be more than half the width of the original house.
  • The overall height should not exceed 4m.
  • The overall length should not exceed 4m (or 8m via the Neighbour Consultation Scheme).

Would it comply with the above? If so, then you should be able to secure CoL approval. If not, you shouldn’t have too many issues if you had to secure formal Planning approval.
 
The wider part of the extension should not be more than half the width of the original house.

Fall short on the above.

Original house width is approx. 12.5m so I am allowed to go 6.25m wide - my initial proposal width is approx. 9.5-10m.

Will go down the full planning route.... thanks for your input.
 
Oh right so yes, you’d be restricted to a width of 6.25m. Anything more will require a formal application by way of a Householder application.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Back
Top