Stairs landing size

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Hi All,

I got a question, can someone help?

My house is semi and extending to 2 storey.
From the stairs I’ll go up and from landing if I turn left and one step climb I’ll go to existing rooms. If turn right I’ll go to new rooms. I would like to know what is the building reg minimum requirement of the space where I’m turning right/left?
 
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Drawings photo attached.
 

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If it's 2 risers up to the new floor level, the arrangement on your drawing would comply.
Minimum distance from the top rise to the facing wall would be equal to the width of the stairs.
 
Crap designer who couldn't specify steps and a landing, has also specified two steel beams for no reason.

That's what happens with shiite plan drawers, you just end up paying more for the build.
 
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has also specified two steel beams for no reason.

For all we know, they might be supporting steel beams at right-angles, which would be needed if supporting a set-back first floor side wall?
(we can't know for sure without seeing a cross-section).
 
For all we know, they might be supporting steel beams at right-angles, which would be needed if supporting a set-back first floor side wall?
(we can't know for sure without seeing a cross-section).
Lol. That's a bog standard extension on a semi.
 
Thanks for the reply. Yes I got setback 300mm for first floor, but still didn’t understand why steel is needed at roof level. I will ask again my structural designer. Attaching ground and level 1 drawings. I haven’t installed level 2 steel yet. But level 1 is done.
 

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And a bog standard cut roof with hips and purlins that need support.:rolleyes:
Do they?

Good design, efficient design, economical design means that steel beams would not be used in this type of extension.

Unless say you are a clueless designer, or a structural engineer being paid to use as much steel work as possible. But never mind, the client will pick up the bill.

I'm sure you've done many extensions on semis. And using steel beams must be standard?
 
I'm sure you've done many extensions on semis. And using steel beams must be standard?
I have done an identical hip end extension, yes. We used steels and timber posts to collect the purlins. The roof was plain clay (heavy). Once the roof was loaded, there was enough deflection on the beams to warrant the ceiling being battened down 15mm or so. Still better than a massive hip blade.
 
Just out of interest, would you build a new hipped roof with timber purlins or just use deeper rafters?
 
Just out of interest, would you build a new hipped roof with timber purlins or just use deeper rafters?
Either or, depending on span and the ridiculous size hip blades have become these days and how that roof detail marries in with existing (wall plate, eaves, fascia, soffit) etc.
 
I have done an identical hip end extension, yes. We used steels and timber posts to collect the purlins. The roof was plain clay (heavy). Once the roof was loaded, there was enough deflection on the beams to warrant the ceiling being battened down 15mm or so. Still better than a massive hip blade.
Open your closed builder mind and read what I wrote about designing.

Presumably you don't design roofs, but just build what the plans say.

At a rough guess, of over 200 extensions on traditional semis, I've never designed in steel beams for purlin support. Likewise, when I've built to others plans, I've not used them either when specified.

Typically it's up to £500 of unnecessary cost to a client.

And that is my point. Clueless designers means the client pays more later.
 

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