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Textured paint on ceilings..

Discussion in 'Decorating and Painting' started by stevewestern, 7 Apr 2013.

  1. stevewestern

    stevewestern

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    I may be about to buy a house with textured paint on all the ceilings, and I don't like the stuff.

    So, what do I do - the actual ceilings seem pretty sound, so do I scrape off the worst of the lumps then easi-fill and sand or should I get a plasterer in to skim the lot ?

    I have never tried to smooth over textured paint so don't know how hard it is to get any sort of decent result - any thoughts ?
     
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  3. footprints

    footprints

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    Skimming by a plasterer is the easyist option stripping is a very messy task.

    The most important thing is to know what you are dealing with, textured coatings which are often called Artex although many companies made them (it tends to be a bit like Thermos or Hoover used as a general name) contained a % of asbestos you should get them tested first. Undisturbed and painted they pose no risk but if damaged they can release fibres.

    Artex removed asbestos towards the end of the 1980's but that's not to say other manufactures did the same, old stock could still be used and asbestos was only finally banned in 1999-2000.

    I do wonder about the practice of skimming known asbestos coatings as later workers will have no warning that the danger is there.
     
  4. stevewestern

    stevewestern

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    Thanks for the reply footprints !

    It isn't Artex - more like Sandtex or the like.
    I am wondering about buying something like a Mirka Ceros to sand them down (I already have a hoover that I can attach it to for dust extraction ) as this would minimize the mess, and I could do it as suited me. However, there is a lot of overhead work for my poor old arms..

    A plasterer will need to board out an entire room which will mean bringing in lots of trestles and scaffold boards but a plastic sheet will make clearing up fairly easy, but as we will be living in the house only one room at a time can be done, so lots of lugging in and out of boards and trestles.
     
  5. footprints

    footprints

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    Hi Steve,
    Working overhead is 10 times worse than sanding a wall and you will undoubtedly have to go over again with filler a number if times.

    I have had rooms skimmed and it's not the trauma you might expect as long as you can clear the main items out of the way, even push them against the wall if too large to move out.

    Plasterers do this all the time and will be in and out before you know it, a couple of days at most. Just one room will take you that long and no mater how careful you are the dust from sanding gets everywhere! It will still be in the air for hours after you have taken off your dust mask and removed dust sheets.

    I used to do every job myself but Iv'e learned there are times when it's best to go to work and come back to find the plastering faries have been
    and it's all done.

    Best wishes,
    footprints
     
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  6. stevewestern

    stevewestern

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    I think you are right footprints - I was getting blinded by the idea of a new tool to play with maybe.....
    I might try to delay us moving in and get a few ceilings done in one hit to make it all easier.

    Now, how do I justify that new toy - get some bad plasterers in ??
     
  7. footprints

    footprints

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    Yes ideal if you can get the plasterer in before you move in with a clear run it will not take him long and may be a cheaper quote.

    You can never have enough tools!
    There will no doubt be loads of woodwork and walls to sand down in a new house, that should justify your expenditure on a Mirka Ceros ;)

    Get yourself the Axminster tool centre catalogue pure tool porn!

    Wonder if that line will get censored :D

    Have fun with your new toys.

    Regards,
    footprints
     
  8. dcdec

    dcdec

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    Would love a ceros myself.

    Some plasterers use stilts, this would save on the work of trestles and boards, OR buy yourself two new toys, stilts and a ceros!
     
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