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Two separate 30m2 Garages next to each other...?

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Headsintheshed, 3 Jul 2017.

  1. Headsintheshed

    Headsintheshed

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    Does anyone happen to know if you're allowed to build two 30m2 detached outbuildings next to each other, thus avoiding the costs (and hassle) of Building Regs? I've been getting very mixed messages regarding footing depth / width for a single storey, single skin brick / block built garage. I was looking at building an L-shaped building of 60m2 total area but I'm now looking at a double garage of 6m x 5m (area 30m2) next to another 3m x 10m (area 30m2) and therefore creating an L-shape of the two. Since each one is under 30m2 (and would conform to height and proximity to boundary requirements etc) Building Control would not need to get involved.
    Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: 3 Jul 2017
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  3. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    What hassle will it be? And it would appear to be a major compromise to the design to not link the two?
     
  4. Headsintheshed

    Headsintheshed

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    The hassle and costs would be in digging footings larger than truly required, getting rid of the earth and then filling 36 linear metres of footings 1metre deep and 600 wide with concrete (approx 22m3 / £2200), Sadly talking to Building Control has not yielded any straight answers. They've said that they cannot tell me what depth of footings are needed - that's for my architect or builder to clarify. But they WILL then tell me if they're not happy with the width & depth when they come and inspect which would then require further digging and spoil disposal (and associated costs). As I will be doing this under a Building Notice there will be no architects drawings (it's only a garage), so I'm at the mercy of getting the footings right first time. One builder advised that for single skin, single storey 450 - 500mm deep would be plenty since I'll be putting rebar in the crete, but then another said 1metre deep x 600 wide. Since I don't fancy getting it "wrong" (ie not satisfying one Building Inspector's requirements) I was exploring the option of doing two separate buildings, each at <30m2...
     
  5. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Is your builder going to guarantee that his 450-500mm deep fouindations wont move in the next 5/10/20 years?

    It's not the weight on the foundations that matters, but the susceptibility of shallow foundations moving up and down unevenly with the seasonal gound movement.

    As to the requirement for building regs, if the two are completely separate - and significantly so, then both may be exempt. But if they look like they will be connected, and access shared, then as they are being built at the same time then it may be deemed as one operation and so not exempt.
     
  6. Headsintheshed

    Headsintheshed

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    All good info, so thanks everyone! If I do two buildings they would have separate entrances but would be right next to each other and would share the driveway as access. One plus point of doing them separately would also be that in the future if / when I sell the property, one could be knocked down to claim back some of the garden (60m2 is taking up quite a lot of garden but my priority is having the cars indoors). The two buildings would be very close (a foot or so) and I was thinking about having them share a roof (which will be fibreglass).
     
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  8. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    Then they won't be separated then. :rolleyes: And despite what some people think/assume, Building Control are an approval body not an advisory one. They see another DIYer and roll their eyes back.
     
  9. Headsintheshed

    Headsintheshed

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    To clarify, I did say "I was thinking about having them share a roof". I'll put you in the "I do not reckon it'll be allowed but I actually don't know" camp.

    As for BC not being an advisory body, they are both for guidance as well as approval. Via the FP process they will simply inspect to plan whereas under a BN they will come and see what you've done and advise if further work is required prior to proceeding.

    Your comment about it being a "major compromise to the design" was interesting as you didn't know what the project was for. As it happens having two buildings could potentially be advantageous as it would be easier to maintain stable conditions for two of the more precious cars.

    I'm not looking for debate or argument, I'm just looking for answers and thought I'd give the forum a try. As I've told many employees in the past, it's actually ok to not know something - just don't waffle on as if you do.
     
    Last edited: 4 Jul 2017
  10. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    Building Control are obliged to tell you you're works on site do not comply, they are under no obligation to advise you what to do to comply, whatever kind of application you use.
     
  11. freddiemercurystwin

    freddiemercurystwin

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    That's right, that's what the question mark was for in my comment.
     
  12. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Yes, but they wont necessarily tell you how to acheive compliance in the further work. eg. they might just say "Your roof timbers are not adequate for the load". When you ask what will be adequate, they say "Ask a structural engineer, call me when its ready for inspection"

    BCO's hate building notices and builders who don't know what to do.
     
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