1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Underfloor heating for bathroom - advice needed please

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by KnightWhoSaysNi, 23 Apr 2015.

  1. KnightWhoSaysNi

    KnightWhoSaysNi

    Joined:
    31 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    83
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I have central heating with a condensing combi boiler and I'm thinking of installing underfloor heating in the bathroom just to make it a bit more comfortable and cleaner.

    The bathroom has a suspended timber floor. The floor area to be covered would be very small, roughly a square metre. (The total area is larger but it's taken by the bathtub, toilet and washbasin.)

    That's about the same as the area of the current radiator, so I reckon the UFH could run at the same temp (and on the same circuit) as the rest of the central heating.

    Would it be worthwhile installing wet UFH (and removing the radiator) or should I keep things unchanged, or install electric UFH to supplement the centrally-heated radiator (that way I would benefit from the separation of the 2 forms of heating - the ease of thermostatic control, latency being less of an issue, etc.)? What would you suggest?
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. Dan Robinson

    Dan Robinson

    Joined:
    1 Jul 2007
    Messages:
    56,034
    Thanks Received:
    9,420
    Location:
    Hertfordshire & London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I wouldn't bother with wet ufh. Spend the money on a GOOD quality electric system.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. flameport

    flameport

    Joined:
    10 Mar 2007
    Messages:
    10,082
    Thanks Received:
    2,033
    Location:
    Poole, Dorset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You cannot run UFH at the same temperature as a radiator. Imagine walking on one of your radiators with bare feet.

    UFH runs at a much lower temperature, so therefore requires a much larger surface are to heat the room - hence why it's usually installed over the entire floor area.

    If you must have UFH, get an electric type. However for just 1 square metre, it is really not worthwhile at all.
     
  5. KnightWhoSaysNi

    KnightWhoSaysNi

    Joined:
    31 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    83
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Cheers, so wet UFH is pointless... I'm still not sure about whether to go for electric or none at all. I don't suppose electric UFH would be costly to fit or run, and it would make it more comfortable as you could walk on it barefoot year round. But then, putting down a bathroom mat or two (one next to the bathtub and the other in front of the toilet) could achieve the same...
     
  6. mikehandy1

    mikehandy1

    Joined:
    1 Apr 2015
    Messages:
    12
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Manchester
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Well even with the underfloor heating you'd need bathmats just to stop water getting everywhere...I like underfloor heating but if it's a really small space does the radiator heat up the room fast anyway?
     
  7. Sponsored Links
  8. Electric is much better for a small area and easier to install too.
     
  9. KnightWhoSaysNi

    KnightWhoSaysNi

    Joined:
    31 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    83
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes, it does. And the UFH wouldn't improve the heat-up times. The point is to have a warm floor and independent controls for it.

    I thought the floor tiles would make the floor reasonably waterproof?
    The bath mats would defeat the point of the UFH.

    Now I'm leaning to dropping the idea of bathroom UFH altogether.
     
  10. Nozzle

    Nozzle

    Joined:
    23 Dec 2012
    Messages:
    2,240
    Thanks Received:
    297
    Location:
    Suffolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I fitted a small electric area in my bathroom - it's no good as the only heat source that much is true (also have a towel radiator). What is does do nicely though is take the chill off the tiles so you don't get cold feet - the perception alone makes the room feel warmer even if the air temperature is cooler.

    Nozzle
     
  11. Agile

    Agile

    Joined:
    26 Jun 2004
    Messages:
    64,039
    Thanks Received:
    4,595
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You can buy cheap bedroom slippers for about £3-£4.

    They have insulating properties so you can comfortably walk on cold tiles.

    They also have no running costs or annual servicing costs!

    UFH gives out about 100 watts per m² so not much use to heat up a room unless you have a lot of area.

    Tony
     
  12. DP

    DP

    Joined:
    10 Dec 2003
    Messages:
    15,148
    Thanks Received:
    3,355
    Location:
    Glasgow
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Tony perhaps you have not had experience of installing UF heating, one I fitted for my son does NOT have vast areas, yet maintains required warmth. You are forgetting radiators start heating room ceiling downwards, while UF puts heat where the (cold) feet are😎
     
  13. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2019
    Country:
    United Kingdom

    If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

    Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


    Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

     
Loading...

Share This Page