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Walk in Wardrobe construction

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by TTCarpentry, 29 May 2017.

  1. TTCarpentry

    TTCarpentry

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    Hi all,

    Ive been asked to build a walk in wardrobe. The customer would like the showroom like look eg. hammonds, sharpes but doesn't want to pay their prices. I've not built wardrobes in this fashion before apart from fitting flat pack type furniture and custom sliding wardrobes, so im looking for a bit of guidance on construction methods and any tips.

    The size is 2430 high, 2.7m x 2.1m approx in a 'U' shape. Some units will have a top shelf and 2 rails.

    So i've planned to buy 18mm melamine chipboard, cut and edged to the sizes shapes required, with a 6mm back board.

    I will screw sides to a base/top with a 30-50mm plinth and leaving a 20mm gap from ceiling for fitting space. There will be several units constructed, to make up the whole wardrobe. there will be a shelf approx 400mm from top on most units again fixed with chipboard screws from the sides, with a hanging rail below. I will also put a fixing, chipboard rail, colour matched above or below shelf (which is best?) to fix through and into wall to support the wardrobes. Each wardrobe will then be fixed to the next as built and fitted, and on the final unit, there will be a deco panel scribed to the wall floor to ceiling, and then fit either a top mounted pelmet or face mounted to hide the out of level ceiling (approx 20mm over the length 2.7m)

    A few questions.

    1) Size and type of screws to fix sheets?
    2) Will i need additional supports for the shelves other than screws from sides?
    3) Is there enough space for a shelf 400mm form top and two hanging rails?
    4) The customer also wants draws, what is the best construction method and draw runners?
    5) how best to hide the screws that fix units together and to back wall?

    Any help and suggestions will be appreciated.

    Thanks
     
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  3. bobsuerita

    bobsuerita

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    if your screwing through the side put decrative panels on the ends to hide or if not use white blocks internally
    i just done some for a neighbour with melomine then vinyl wrapped them

    ignore small door its a draw just waiting for runners to turn up
     

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  4. TTCarpentry

    TTCarpentry

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    Nice job.

    The one ive been asked to build is more like this:
    upload_2017-5-29_21-19-49.png

    so theres no doors, the screws that will be on show will be inside the units to fix each unit to the next and to fix to back wall.
     

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  5. bobsuerita

    bobsuerita

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    if you have a plinth and a pelmit i would fix to floor and ceiling then use plinth pelmet to hide fixings as for joining i would use the joining bolts plastic ones as you can get them them in what ever colour you want
    and for draw runners i always find the bottom mounted ones the best
    heres a nice little way to do draws
    http://www.viewalongtheway.com/2014/03/building-drawers-overcoming-crises/
     
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  6. TTCarpentry

    TTCarpentry

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    cheers Bob,

    re, fixing below and above plinth/pelmet, are you thinking 'L' brackets? theres not going to be a lot of room, particularly above.
     
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  8. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Personally think the chipboard looks cack, would use 18mm mdf , make up free standing unit and just secure to wall just above top shelf where they will be out of sight.
    Kitchen draw pack give a quick and easy solution to drawers.
     
  9. TTCarpentry

    TTCarpentry

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    Customer doesn't want to paint MDF. They want a finished board.

    Yea, I think fixing above top shelf will be least noticeable.

    Thanks re. kitchen draw pack, I'll check them out.
     
  10. chappers

    chappers

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    I tend to agree with Foxy on contiboard, Sharpes and the like will foil wrap their timber.
    I suppose it boils down to costs and the customers expectations, though.
    They CAD design and make all their stuff in a factory and it is essentially a posh flat pack installed on site. you will struggle to hand build to that finish unless you have a decent workshop with all the relevant gear and you won't get near it in chipboard, which isn't a problem as long as they aren't expecting the Sharpes finish.
    Do you have any idea on how much they were quoted, as I would expect to be charging north of £5k for something like that, hand built, even in MDF.
    Not sure if you do much fitted furniture, but if you don't it's easy to underestimate how long it takes I reckon just this little lot took me the best part of a week and cost about £400 in materials I reckon I would have quoted a client £1500.
    On the construction front I would avoid screwing into the edges of chipboard and consider something along the lines of cam bolts, which are far more substantial, you could use blocks if the client is OK with that, but they will be visible.
    I prefer heavy duty double or treble extending runners to kitchen runners and like to make to dovetail draw boxes, makes them much stronger and adds a little something, kitchen draw packs are OK in kitchens, though you may be able to utilise drawer fronts.
    Not sure if sizes would work for you and it would add to costs, but could you utilise kitchen decorative panels, cupboard and drawer fronts etc as they will give a much better finish. the toilet unit and the shelves in the bathroom picture were built around the sink unit using decorative end panels and plinths from Howdens and cost about £80 all in against the £80 better bathrooms wanted for the toilet unit alone.
    The real advantage is that all the panels and doors are foil wrapped, so no unsightly corners.
    You are probably aware of the types of fixings and fixtures that come with flat packs and kitchens and most of these are available from the likes of Hafele or ironmongery direct.
     
  11. charliegolf

    charliegolf

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    Not wanting to be flamed for swearing, but I bought Ikea 'Pax' carcasses for my walk-in wardrobe. They are not much different to TTC's pic, and as long as the client is ok with the fixing holes, they are incredibly versatile with loads of accesories. A proper tradesman (I am a diyer) would be able to do loads with it, I'm sure, to make it bespoke.
     
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