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Where to put isolator for bathroom fan

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by mrbg07546, 6 Feb 2017.

  1. mrbg07546

    mrbg07546

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    our sparky is about to wire our bathroom fan. The standard place to put isolator is above door. Which I don't think would look great as it's in hall way.


    Any other suggestions where to put it.
    We have a loft conversation as was thinking of putting in a small area there??
     
  2. endecotp

    endecotp

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    It is normally OK for it to be in the bathroom, if at ceiling level.
     
  3. mrbg07546

    mrbg07546

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    On the ceiling? Or high up in the wall?
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    You can put the isolator down in the garage if you like, as long as it satisfies the requirement for isolation and can not be switched back on if the fan is being worked on.
     
  5. mrbg07546

    mrbg07546

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    Ok I've seen some "zone diagrams". There's area in my bathroom which are outside zone 2. Can I position it there?
     
  6. endecotp

    endecotp

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  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Which is above eyeline and not conspicuous.

    Unless you choose to have white walls and a purple switch, or vice versa.

    Chances are there are several switches and sockets in your house that are not hidden. This is generally considered to be quite normal.
     
  8. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Isn't it up to the electrician who will be certifying the work?
     
  9. mrbg07546

    mrbg07546

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    Yes and he said above door. And I wanted to ask about other people's options before he comes and doesnwork
     
  10. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Then ask him to tell you all the places that it could be fitted, and then pick one.
     
  11. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    You don't have to have one at all if you don't want one.
     
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  12. stubob

    stubob

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    You could use a 3 pole pull switch.
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Theoretically, yes (assuming you could find one) - but there's probably no need for a functional switch (it's probably operated from the light), so it seems a bit much to have a string dangling down all the time so that the fan can be isolated once every few years, if ever! As has been said, there's really no need for an isolator at all.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. securespark

    securespark

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  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Thanks. Yes, I rather assumed that they probably existed (but didn't bother to look!). I can but presume that they exist because some people want to use them as functional switches (not that manually-switched fans are all that common), doubling as isolators - since, as I said, it would seem very odd to have a pullcord only for 'once in a blue moon' use for isolation!

    I realise that most, if not all, of them have mechanical indications of their state, hence acceptable for isolation, but I have to say that (probably irrationally) I'm not sure whether I would feel totally comfortable working on something that was isolated by a pull switch. In what is probably a silly way, it just doesn't sound/fee "right" to me! Those who insist that an isolator has to be 'locked off' would presumably have a particular problem!

    Kind Regards, John
     
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