Will this drive an LED bulb

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by MenBehavingBadly, 27 Jan 2020.

  1. MenBehavingBadly

    MenBehavingBadly

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    Hi All

    Will this transformer drive a 12V LED downlight instead of a 12V Halogen ?

    Would save swapping them for LED drivers

    upload_2020-1-27_13-5-30.png

    Thanks
     
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  3. SFK

    SFK

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    Likely not.
    The wiggly line after the 11.4V shows that the output is ac.
    Not the 12V dc that you need for most LEDs.

    Do you have the details of the 12V LED downlight you plan to use?

    Any reason why you canot simply change to 240V downlights with 240V GU10 bulbs?
     
  4. MenBehavingBadly

    MenBehavingBadly

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    OK thanks I get it

    There is a strong preference to retain the current MR16 downlight fittings from SWMBO :)
     
  5. SFK

    SFK

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    Okay, note that I have never used MR16 (more used to 12V DC Led lighting).
    So I am happy to be corrected.

    BUT my understanding is that these following MR16 bulbs are 12V.
    And being MR16's are likely to be designed to accept 12V ac.

    BUT the issue is that your 'transformer' (power supply) is rated for 60W, and optimal for 20W to 60W (1VA can be considered to be =1W).
    And it says on its label that it is for 'LowVoltage-Halogen Lamps'.
    So it is very likely to not work properly when trying to supply LED and only 5W (some will think there is a fault and stop, some will make the LED flicker).

    But you could give the following 12V a try, but likely to fail:
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/lap-gu5-3-mr16-led-light-bulb-345lm-4-6w-5-pack/6557v.
    https://www.screwfix.com/c/electric...e=mr16#category=cat8350001&lightbulbtype=mr16
     
    Last edited: 27 Jan 2020
  6. winston1

    winston1

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    240v GU10 lamps are also MR16 which is the size or the lamp in eighths of an inch. You could possibly change the lamp connectors and retain the fittings.

    No that power supply (not transformer) is not suitable for GU5.3 LEDs. This comes up regularly on these forums. That power supply gives out AC in tens of kHz, OK for halogen lights not OK for LEDs designed for DC or 50/60Hz AC.
     
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  8. MenBehavingBadly

    MenBehavingBadly

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    yeah I was wondering about that on another thread but a) it wasn't clear if I could put a 240V bulb in a 12V downlight fitting due to no earth?? and b) the 12V connector is sprung and its that that holds the bulb in place so I couldn't find a suitable replacement

    upload_2020-1-27_16-7-54.png

    upload_2020-1-27_16-8-59.png
     
  9. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    sticking 240 lampholders in a fitting made to to operate on 12 volt is a bodge in my opinion.
    Most fittings can be replaced with a similar 240 volt version , thats been tested and certified safe.
     
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  10. flameport

    flameport

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    It can be done, but only if the GU10 lampholders and the attached wires are Class II, and so is the connection arrangement where the lampholder connects to the circuit wiring - typically a connector block inside a plastic box with parts to secure the flex in place.

    These are Class II and can be used in some types of fitting with no earth:
    gu10_class2.jpg

    These are not, and are intended for Class I fittings which do have an earth connection:
    gu10_class1.jpg
     
  11. MenBehavingBadly

    MenBehavingBadly

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    Thanks for your help everyone !
     
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