Wiring A chandelier

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I tried to install a chandelier just with the three hole connector supplied but I don’t think this is possible. I believe I connected both reds to the brown of the chandelier, both blacks to the blue and both earths to the earth. However, it tripped the RCD as soon as the dimmer switch was switched on.

Is it possible to wire it just with a three hole connector?
 
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I tried to install a chandelier just with the three hole connector supplied but I don’t think this is possible. I believe I connected both reds to the brown of the chandelier, both blacks to the blue and both earths to the earth. However, it tripped the RCD as soon as the dimmer switch was switched on.
It would do - one of the blacks was probably the switched live. Did you make a note of which one was which when you took the old light or ceiling rose away?

You really, really ought to learn how lighting circuits work - particularly if you didn't make a note, as in that case you're going to have to find out which black is neutral, and which isn't, so understanding will be a great help. Would have stopped you making that mistake too.

Don't be surprised, BTW, if the dimmer is now wrecked.




Is it possible to wire it just with a three hole connector?
No - you'll need to provide a connector for the permanent lives.

https://www.diynot.com/wiki/Electrics:Lighting-Rose
 
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Yes, of course.

*************** deleted.
 
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People make mistakes

deleted - pack it in you two.

*********************************
 
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I have a couple chandeliers in my house. I relocated the ceiling roses above the ceiling and just connected the 3 core outlet flex from the rose to the chandelier under the chandelier rose using a terminal block.
 
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I have a couple chandeliers in my house. I relocated the ceiling roses above the ceiling and just connected the 3 core outlet flex from the rose to the chandelier under the chandelier rose using a terminal block.
Ceiling roses are not made for that purpose! There is no strain relief for any of the cables. They fit on the ceiling, not flapping around.
 
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I don’t know what you mean - there’s no strain on any of the cables. The ceiling rose is in the void between the downstairs ceiling and the upstairs floor. The flex that would have a pendant on it is connected to the flex from the chandelier with a 5amp terminal block and sits, with no strain, under the gold chandelier rose. There is a bracket supporting the weight of the chandelier secured to a spreader plate of wood also in the void between ceiling and floor that is connected by some very long screws that go through the bracket, plaster ceiling rose and ceiling.
 
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The design of a pendant is for the plate to be screwed to the ceiling and the cables that run inside the ceiling space are clipped to the joists. That way, any pull on any of the cables/conductors will not pull the conductor out of any of the terminals.

When cables are not otherwise supported, the junction box must include clamps to ensure that the cables cannot be pulled out.
The sort of junction box you should have REPLACED the pendant with is something like this
ASJ501.JPG

or
WAGOBOXLXX.JPG
 
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I’ll bear that in mind. I’ve used the same method with ceiling fans. They’ve lasted for the last 40 years and two houses so I suppose I’ve just been lucky.
 
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I’ll bear that in mind. I’ve used the same method with ceiling fans. They’ve lasted for the last 40 years and two houses so I suppose I’ve just been lucky.
Probably no more lucky than any of us - that's what we nearly always experience, since cables in the space between floor and ceiling are exceedingly unlikely to get 'yanked' after being installed, hence will never put strain on the connections, even in the absence of 'strain relief' (cable clamps).

However, regulations and 'best practice' often seek to guard against even the 'exceedingly unlikely'.

Kind Regards, John
 
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