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Wiring manual thermostat to room heater

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Spursnwagos, 28 Sep 2021.

  1. Spursnwagos

    Spursnwagos

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    I have a Honeywell T6360 manual thermostat and a room heater with live, neutral and earth. The supply for them is a fused spur. There is no switched live like on a boiler. How would this get wired?
     
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  3. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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    I'm afraid your manual thermostat is designed to connect to wet central heating systems. It has a 10A maximum load and isn't really suitable for directly controlling an electric (Is it electric? Can you provide a name and model for more help?) room heater.

    Usually the built in thermostat on the room heater is all that is required.
    However, there are manual thermostats available that are suitable for direct connection of an electric heater.
     
    Last edited: 28 Sep 2021
  4. Spursnwagos

    Spursnwagos

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    The electric heater is 800w infrared. Was wondering if I could put live supply to 1, heater and supply neutral to 2 and heater live to 3?
     
  5. Spursnwagos

    Spursnwagos

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    The infrared heater does not have a built in controller like a storage heater or oil filled.
     
  6. flameport

    flameport

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    A thermostat wired to an IR heater will do nothing.
    Thermostats sense the air temperature.
    IR heaters don't heat the air.
     
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  7. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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    Would a PIR with timer be more suitable?
    Edit:
    ...just realised what I suggested!
    As long as it points away from the IR heater (and any reflections!).
     
    Last edited: 28 Sep 2021
  8. Spursnwagos

    Spursnwagos

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    I have wired digital stats for other heaters and the thermal mass seems to trigger them. I have not needed to connect an ir heater to a manual thermostat until now. The instructions say to connect neutral to 2 for less than 6 amps.
     
  9. stem

    stem

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    Whilst infrared heaters don't heat the air, in a domestic room setting they will warm objects that are in the range of the rays, such as furniture, walls, etc., these objects then will in turn warm the air. So, in some circumstances a room thermostat can work, but it should not be in the direct firing line of the IR rays.

    The sun emits infrared, so think of it in the same way, something directly in sunlight (eg car roof) will get heated directly by the rays, and then that in turn will heat the surrounding air.
     
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  11. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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  12. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I do remember in the 60's having an inferred heater, it had 4 bars, as switching on/off does not work, as soon as you switch it off you feel cold, so output was adjusted by how many bars were switched on.

    Even small bathroom heaters tended to have two elements.

    Normally we use inferred heating as part of a larger package, I used it for years, it was called tungsten lighting, the thermostat was set to 18°C air temperature, we was ample during the day when moving around, then in the evening we switched on the lights so got inferred heating from the lights which resulted in room feeling as if at 21°C. When we swapped to LED lighting we also had to change the thermostat to a programmable type so temperature was raised in the evening, which of cause resulted in air changes costing more energy, but saving money as used gas for heating.

    I have looked at the idea of controlling inferred heating a few times, but only method is to split the heaters into sections, so more or less sections activated, yes the inferred does heat the items in the room, and then they heat the room, but the difference felt between off and on is too great to get automated control.

    We see this outside, the sun goes behind a cloud and we feel cold, but the metal of the car can still be too hot to touch. But inferred heating passes through glass, so during the day they need aiming so they do not shine at windows. But only way to control is when combined with other forms of heating, so we keep air to say 16°C and we know the inferred makes that feel like 22°C but it is the back ground heat we control, not the inferred.
     
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  13. Spursnwagos

    Spursnwagos

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    I think the thread has drifted a little. The initial issue is how to wire a manual room thermostat for a device with live, neutral and earth that is designed to be plugged in. There is no switch live like a boiler would have. The effectiveness of the thermostat is not entirely relevant as the room temperature is mainly governed by sunlight through the window, the idea is that the room temperature will determine whether the IR heater is needed at all. I have tested the contacts on the Honeywell manual thermostat and 1 and 2 are the supply and 3 is live with call to heat. I am thinking that I can therefore connect 3 back to the heater live and combine the neutrals either in contact 2 or back at the junction. Just wondered if anyone had wired a plug in device to a manual thermostat like the Honeywell.
     
  14. RandomGrinch

    RandomGrinch

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    I don't believe the thread has drifted - it is trying to understand the logic of using a thermostat to control an IR heat source.

    Yes, your method of control and connection to the thermostat will 'work'.

    But due to the issues highlighted by others, the most effective way of using an IR heat source is just to turn it on if you are cold.
    Controlled by a thermostat, the room can be using a not insignificant 800W, without any occupants being there to benefit from it.

    But as I say, yes, you can wire it the way you want! :)
     
  15. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    The thermostat is just a switch (which might also need a neutral) so of course you can wire it as you say.

    However, you are missing the point that with an infra-red heater the thermostat would need to detect your temperature; not the room's - because the room might be cold but your body might have been warmed enough and to a lesser extent, vice versa.

    You do not want the heater to be turned on if you are not in the room for long periods.
    You might say that at those times you will turn off the heater in which case the thermostat will be unnecessary.
     
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  16. stem

    stem

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    The thermostat instructions show you how to do it. [Earth omitted for clarity :)] I've shown the A version, but the principle is the same if you have one of the other versions.

    Capture.JPG

    The heating load is the 'heater' and you can connect it via a plug and socket if you like. However as has been pointed out the thermostat is rated at 10A (resistive) so someone could in theory come along and plug in a 3kW heater (13A) which wouldn't be a good idea.
     
    Last edited: 30 Sep 2021
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  17. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I would look at underfloor heating thermostats as able to take the current. Or if plug in the inkbird 308 thermostat, all set up to plug in, and you can change all settings. Around £27 and all pre set-up.
     
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