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5w30 for 2007 Ford KA 1.3i

Discussion in 'Car Repairs / Maintenance' started by DIYspanner, 27 Mar 2017.

  1. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    Any decent fully synthetic oil?

    Quantum III Longlife or Granville Hyperlube perhaps?
     
  2. DaveHerns

    DaveHerns

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    Triple QX that Euro Car Parts sell is cheap and was good enough for 2 of my cars.
     
  3. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    There's a fully synthetic Granville Hyperlube 5w30 specially made for the Ford Duratec engines for £17 so will go for that.

    I've also sourced Mann oil and fuel filters.
     
  4. londoner1

    londoner1

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    Comma 5w30 at £17 for 5L on fleabay
     
  5. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    From what I've read about Comma, folk seem to think their engine oils are budget quality.

    All the supermarkets sell Comma as their own brand.
     
  6. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I put myself on Halfords mailing list.

    From time to time they offer premium oils on a half-price deal for a one-day or two-day offer. Or offers on their own brand, which is about the same as your ebay price http://www.halfords.com/motoring/engine-oils-fluids/engine-oil?grade=5W/30#

    Though it is better to carry out regular oil and filters on the correct schedule, than to save up for a high-priced oil and scrimp on maintenance.

    Lots of engines were designed ten, twenty or more years ago, to run on the oils available then, and modern oils are better. If you look up the old handbook, it may say 10W40 as one of the options for an outdoor temperature which easily spans UK weather, winter and summer.
     
    Last edited: 29 Mar 2017
  7. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    6k miles interval in my book.

    £17 for a Granville 5w30 fully synthetic , blended for Ford engines, seems canny.

    The KA 1.3i has a Duratec engine so all is good although what I've read on Wiki, Duratec covers a range of engines. Maybe the name of the place where they make the engines.
     
  8. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Duratec (petrol) and Duratorq (diesel) are the names adopted by Ford in the early 2000's, I think - in conjunction with development with PSA of France.
    The 5/30 synthetic will be fine.....it was actually produced after Ford had a nightmare issue with the valves sticking in the early Zetec DOHC motor. The oil viscosity was reduced and the problems largely disappeared (after many folks got new cylinder heads :eek:)
    John :)
     
  9. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    Going off on a tangent slightly, as far as I'm aware, the filter is normally only by-passed when the engine is cold.

    That's the only time deposits in the oil can get to shell bearings and cause wear - correct assumption?
     
  10. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Pressurised lubrication systems can include a bypass valve which deploys when oil pressure is so high that filter damage could be expected.....simplified, it's basically a ball bearing which is held by a spring - when pressure is so high, the ball bearing lifts off it's seat allowing oil to bypass.
    I'm sure designs vary, but most bypass systems just allow oil to return to the sump.
    John :)
     
  11. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    I read once that when the engine is cold, the main volume of pumped oil by-passesed the filter.

    I remember once hearing "never rev a cold engine".

    I presume from what you say John, in modern engines, no oil passes into the engine unfiltered.
     
  12. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    In the days of yore, oil was much thicker of course and I'm sure it's correct what you say - quite a volume of oil was expelled through the bypass system before being pumped into the oil galleries.
    Pressure relief valves are located in the oil pump now - as far as I am aware - and if excess pressure occurs the oil returns to the sump so the engine does receive filtered oil.
    I'd guess the phrase of not revving a cold engine does bear some sense.....if oil quantity to the main and big end bearings was restricted then there wouldn't be as much splash to the cylinder bores - but that's only my theory! I still tend to be sympathetic with my engines and do just that - in fact on my motorbike engine (1200cc BMW) on cold start up, the rev counter warns you not to over rev - in effect the 'red line' is much lower.
    John :)
     
  13. DaveHerns

    DaveHerns

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    With the old Essex V4 and V6 engines you weren't to over-rev them when cold as the extra loading on the oil pump due to the oil being thick could strip the sides of the drive shaft. That would have been with 20w oil, now we use 5w so the problem won't arise.
     
  14. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    I seem to recall the V6 had a fibrous or plastic timing gear, driven by the crankshaft at the front of the engine.....I've certainly replaced one but I can't remember why it was stripped.
    Maybe due to thick oil, if the oil pump is cam driven.
    This was on a Scimitar - if ever there was a difficult vehicle to work on, this was it! Put a clutch in one many moons ago, and had to glue the bell housing bolts to my fingers with Bostik first to get them in :eek: A right PITA.
    John :)
     
  15. DIYspanner

    DIYspanner

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    The Millers oil guide and the car handbook recommend 10w40 for my nephew's 2002 1.2 8v Punto.

    Is there any harm trying 5w30 instead?

    Its at 110k miles.
     
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