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Advice on circular saw for a gift

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by sarahlu, 11 Mar 2021.

  1. sarahlu

    sarahlu

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  3. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    For cutting timber to length a chop saw is ideal - for cutting timber down its length its a table saw.
    Personally I wouldn’t recommend a hand held circular saw just yet unless cutting sheets of ply is intended.
    John :)
     
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  4. sarahlu

    sarahlu

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    Is a mitre saw and a chop saw the same thing? (Sorry!)
     
  5. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Yes, these saws have a compass on the base where various angles can be cut.
    They have an indent which locks the angle in place - common ones being 90 and 45 degrees, naturally enough.
    Great to bolt these things down onto a Workmate bench or similar ( more pressies beckon!)
    John :)
     
  6. ETAF

    ETAF

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    there are quite a few other makes, but no expert here
    Erbauer have quite a range of 18v cordless.
    when we were allowed into shops I saw at B&Q had a very large range of Ryobi cordless tools, seem to have a good range of different tools, BUT I only have experience of a couple of there corded tools, sanders

    Usually its the Drill/Driver sets where you get the deals with multiple batteries, and sometimes these offers lock you into the brand range.

    I also seem to think Erbauer changed batteries recently. EXT Range
    But screwfix do a kit with a 4AH Battery
    not usually ,
    https://sensibledigs.com/chop-saws-vs-miter-saws/
    https://www.finepowertools.com/saws/miter-saw-vs-chop-saw/
    a chop saw only cuts 90 degrees, but a mitre saw can cut at an angle 45 angle
    Mitre saw can be fixed or a sliding mitre saw SMS can cut larger pieces of wood.
    heres a fixed Mitre saw
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Evolution-...49&hvtargid=pla-385530046508&psc=1&th=1&psc=1
    And a sliding Mitre saw
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Evolution-R210SMS-300-Multi-Material-Sliding-Mitre/dp/B07FQW29R2/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?crid=2TDEGB9V48SIL&dchild=1&keywords=sliding+mitre+saw&qid=1615480717&s=diy&sprefix=sliding+,diy,188&sr=1-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzNVNGU0NYODJPMzZXJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNjI4NzM4NENOUkdQRVFSVE5OJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTAwNTQ0MjAyM0ZEMVhOMjRXQVJCJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==
    Both are just to show the difference Neither are a recommendation as i only know of 1 sliding saw Evolution my Son-in-law has https://www.ffx.co.uk/product/Get/E...117-240V-255Mm-Double-Bevel-Sliding-Mitre-Saw

    Evolution are good, my son-in-law a dewalt & Milwaukee fan, has purchased the SMS & also the Table saw and is very impressed
    I have a dewalt SMS - which I use a lot of the time on home projects, although the one I have has done up considerably (almost 50%) in the last 2 years and now £500+
     
    Last edited: 11 Mar 2021
  7. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Erbaure Mitre says are very very good, the build quality knock evolution out the park.

    erbauer cordless tools though, i dont find them that cheap against big brands that are on offer, and generally they aren't particularly powerful when put up against the competition.

    avoid einhell.

    Ryobi is a good all round option for price longevity and performance. There one+ battery range is very good also, and there isnt many tools they don't do in cordless.

    personally i have Hitachi/Hikoki, but i've only fallen into there system as i bought a drill on offer in screwfix many years ago, and have since purchased extras which has given me lots of spare batteries. The problem with Hikoki/hitachi at the moment is since the brand change the big guns (screwfix) have stopped stocking most of their tools, and so they are now a niche brand and generally have to use specialist tool shops to purchase the kit, and they now seem intent on pushing their 36v multivolt tooling which although very good is ruddy expensive, and they have started to discontinue much of their 18v only product as they age out, which is slightly soul destroying.
     
  8. opps

    opps

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    I (respectfully) suspect that she may not be aware of the limitations of circular saws. If for example, she purchases a 3" bit of timber and wants to rip it down to 2", whilst it is possible with a circular saw, it is (potentially) much safer and easier with a table saw. If she wants to cut square ends on lengths of timber a chop saw would be better. If she wants cut a full sheet of MDF in half she can use the circular saw but will need to put something sacrificial under it and possibly use a clamped straight edge as a guide.

    For a DIYer who wants a circular saw to cut sheet materials, I would probably recommend a plunge type saw with a guide rail that it sits on. But she seems to do much more than that. You say she has no other power tools, do you mean she doesn't have a cordless drill? If not once she cuts the timber, how will she assemble it?

    Hand saws aside, if I could only ever own one type of powered saw, I would probably opt for a jigsaw. A couple of years ago, I used my jigsaw with the guide rail attachment to cut some 18mm 8ft lengths of plywood for a log cabin floor (my plunge saw was elsewhere). The cuts were accurate to 0.5mm. That said, it would be rubbish at cutting accurate ends on 3*3 inch timber, as would a circular saw in the hands of a DIYer.

    Sorry, I am not trying to muddy the waters (even though I have).
     
  9. sarahlu

    sarahlu

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    Its okay, I'd rather consider everything before I make a purchase. She is going to get a drill and perhaps some others bits, I think she has an old crappy one but it wasn't a brand that I needed to consider sticking to for this time if that makes sense.

    I've watched a video on youtube and a mitre saw doesn't seem right for her either, as it looks too narrow to make something like panelling as far as I can tell. I'm so confused now, I think I might just let her tell me what she wants and on her head be it :LOL:
     
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  11. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    A mitre / chop saw is great for cutting small sections of timber to accurate lengths.....the sort of pre planed softwood you buy from wickes etc, up to maybe 75mm square or whatever.
    These are no good for panels and for that I’d recommend a table saw which can be bolted to a Workmate or similar if it doesn’t come with a stand.
    A hand circular saw is brilliant for doing this too but the sheets need to be on a large bench first for support.
    Has Sis considered some hand saws? 24” panel saw plus a good tenon type back saw would be good for getting basic skills.
    John :)
     
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  12. blup

    blup

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    Do not give someone with no, or little, diy experience a table saw chop saw or even circular saw.

    As Burnerman says start with a hand saw.

    Blup
     
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  13. Celeronmanuk

    Celeronmanuk

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    I too would feel a bit uneasy buying quite a dangerous tool for someone with seemingly little experience in DIY. The blades on these tools can inflict significant injury in a split second. Perhaps just take that into consideration.
     
  14. ETAF

    ETAF

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    That may dictate the cordless brand she goes for
    Other Bits?

    I use a drill/impact driver a lot for DIY around the house

    She specifically asked for a Circular Saw, do you know why and what she had in mind to use it for ?
    is it just for making the panelling

    Circular saw was quite low on the list, the sort of order i went in
    Drill/impact driver, Planer, Jigsaw, multitool, Circular saw, SDS Drill, grinder was the cordless range i went - and covered a lot of jobs I have done around the home & Garden.
    But I do use a Sliding Mitre saw a lot mains operated,

    Another useful set i have , is a pair of tressels/saw horses C700 from toughbuilt
     
    Last edited: 12 Mar 2021
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  15. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    I think as you said let her tell you what it is she wants.

    Ignore the people saying how dangerous saws are.

    I think we need to give a fully grown adult the benefit of the doubt that they would think about what there doing and ensure they and their fingers are safe
     
  16. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    With every respect, I can’t agree with the statements concerning an adult having enough wisdom to know what they are doing regarding power tools and circular saws in particular aren’t dangerous.
    My neighbour was cutting up his Christmas tree with a chop saw :eek: He got away with that one.
    Another local guy reached over the hedge to get his electric hedge trimmer and caught the trigger on a branch as he pulled it through :eek: he didn’t get away with that one.
    Although it is possible to self teach regarding some machinery, advise and professional instruction from a
    seasoned user is invaluable.
    John :)
     
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  17. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    OK, what I will say about saws at this juncture is that with apprentices we start off by getting them used to using a hand saw and becoming reasonably proficient in hand sawing before we allow them to progress. This generates an appreciation for the material and how it cuts ,(e.g rip cuts vs. cross cuts), develops their eye for making a straight cut, develops some of the muscle memory they will need in later life, too - but most importantly, not every cut can be made with a powered saw and there are always times when an "original cordless" (hand) saw needs to be used so learning how to use a hand saw is kind of important IMHO. Once they have mastered hand saws we then start to transition them onto circular saws, starting with a porttable rip saw (the sort of saw most people are familiar with). Powered saws most definitely can be dangerous in untrained or inexperienced hands. For example how many tyros understand that you never, ever position yourself directly behind a portable power saw? Or understand the need for adequate work support when sawing? Or why you should avoid sawing on the floor if at all possible? Or how suitable a bit of kit is for the task they are trying to undertake? Sadly the little "manual" which comes with saws never seems to cover stuff like this.

    My one piece of advice is therefore if you do buy your friend a saw, try to arrange a bit of training. Maybe there's a local college running DIY courses who can help.

    Stay safe
     
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