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Do I need a SDS drill for wall ties in hard brick

Discussion in 'Building' started by Gary111, 10 Oct 2021.

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  1. Gary111

    Gary111

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    I need to fit wall ties to an area of hard bricks on an old building
    am I best to get an SDS drill ?

    Will maybe a 50 pound one do ?
    Is it better if the drill is heavier or lighter ?
    I notice the weight is listed on the adverts,
    Thanks
     
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  3. blup

    blup

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    A 2kg sds drill should suffice, good quality corded ones by leading brands are available relatively cheaply as cordless now dominate the market.

    Blup
     
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  4. noseall

    noseall

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    YES. Always.
     
  5. opps

    opps

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    Do you mean that you want to remove tiles that are currently on a rendered or plastered wall made of hard bricks?

    If yes, as previously mentioned, a 2kg drill will help, but you will need one with rotation stop that will work in hammer only mode. You can get curved chisel designed specifically for tiles.

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/armeg-sds-plus-shank-tile-removing-chisel-80-x-180mm/89391

    A Japanese cat's claw will also be usefully.

    https://www.tftools.co.uk/products/...rers-cats-paw-bar?_pos=7&_sid=005963e96&_ss=r

    Don't forget to wear safety spectacles and gloves. The tiles can generate tiny shards as snap.


    EDIT------------------ sorry, I was born stupid. I read it as tiles, and not ties. Nevertheless, I would still recommend that If you buy a SDS drill, get one with roto stop, erm... incase you ever want to remove tiles/etc.
     
    Last edited: 11 Oct 2021
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  7. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Any SDS will drill holes. If its a one off use, then get the cheapest or hire one.

    Weight has little to do with drilling performance, but will impact (literally) on your arms.

    Joules is the factor to watch out for, more is better
     
  8. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    If the bricks are hard and the mortar soft you may well find using an SDS will loosen the brick and it will start to move.
     
  9. opps

    opps

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    In such a situation, how would you propose drilling in to the brick? Sorry, I am not being snarky. I can't, offhand think of any diamond bits that will be sufficient. Before buying an SDS drill, I once bent a 7mm masonry drill bit trying to drill in to an engineering brick. Admittedly it was a bit from a DIY shed. I was using a 705 watt impact/percussion drill. The bit glowed red. I applied more pressure, it bent (very slightly). I binned it and used a SDS. 10 minutes with old drill, I had made a very slight dent in the brick. 15(?) seconds with the SDS, I had a 70mm deep hole.
     
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  10. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    Sorry, should have worded it better - I wasn't suggesting an alternative, just passing on a warning from my own experience. The answer is SDS, but carefully! Perhaps start small and open up. Just saying if you do have soft mortar and go in hard with a powerful drill and a big bit....
     
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