Garden decking height

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Hi all,

I have read some relevant posts but still not quite sure whether my decking is under PD or not.

My house is on a sloping site. My front door is the highest point, and my kitchen is the buildings' lowest point. As a result, my garden decking is about 1 meter, in height, higher than the ground, while it is on the same level as my front door.

I know that the ground level is the highest part of the surface of the ground next to the building. My question is that "next to the building" means to any points of the building?

I attached the drawing to illustrate my case. If the highest part refers to point A (my front door), my decking should fall within permitted development, right?

Many thanks for any advice.
 

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the actual wording is next to the platform or words to that effect so must be a max 300mm at the highest point on the back wall or the ground it touches the house is irrelivent
 
No that's not PD, it needs to be no higher than 300mm higher than the ground immediately adjacent to it to be PD.
 
Does the law/regulations limit how large a step you can have outside your back door?
 
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Does the law/regulations limit how large a step you can have outside your back door?
building regs if its an outwards opening door it must open onto a square landing the size off the stairs or opening can it be bigger yes but more than a few inches would turn into a raised platform at what point probably when a chair can be left out off the way with a fully openable closable door who knows
 
the actual wording is next to the platform or words to that effect so must be a max 300mm at the highest point on the back wall or the ground it touches the house is irrelivent
Many thanks. I am still confused, and need to redraw my illustration. As shown below, the decking is next to the kitchen, which is the extension of the original building. If we measure from point A, the original ground floor, it is less than 30cm. if we measure from the extension point B, it is more than 30cm. Which measurement is correct in our case? Thanks again.
 

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No that's not PD, it needs to be no higher than 300mm higher than the ground immediately adjacent to it to be PD.
Many thanks. I have added a new photo above, as the decking is next to the kitchen (the extension of the building), should we also measure from the ground floor next to the kitchen, or the original building. thank you.
 
you must ignore the house it serves no purpose in this instance its the natural ground level the decking is on or next to
 
On your first diagram you said the deck was greater than 30cm from the original ground level. On your second diagram you're saying it is less than 30cm? So which is it?
 
On your first diagram you said the deck was greater than 30cm from the original ground level. On your second diagram you're saying it is less than 30cm? So which is it?

Sorry for the confusion. As of the sloping nature, the decking is more than 30cm in height than the natural ground level vertically. However, it is on the same level as the kitchen extension, as well as the original building's ground floor.
 
you must ignore the house it serves no purpose in this instance its the natural ground level the decking is on or next to

Thank you. The natural ground level that the decking is on, is definitely more than 30cm. But, I am not sure how to define "next to". As the decking is next to the kitchen, which is an extension from the building.
 
they use the term "next to" in case you cant get under the decking to measure as i say the house has no relevance here imagine you have removed the decking look for the highest natural point it will cover then thats your 300mm datum point
 

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