Gas pipe position

M

marsaday

I am ripping out a kitchen at the moment and rejigging some walls to make a big kitchen / diner.

The gas pipe goes under the floor from the meter under the stairs and pops up near the cooker point and then onto the boiler - about 4m of travel.

It will be much simpler to just drill through the wall lower down in the stairwell cupboard and have the gas pipe come along the wall and so be hidden behind the new kitchen units. I would set the pipe low down so you can see it behind the cabinet plinth.

Is this allowed or does the pipe have to go under the floor where there is a better air flow ?
 
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M

marsaday

I do know this and will be working with my mate who is GS registered. Just wanted to see if running the gas pipe behind the cabinets (or under them was a no no). I didn't expect it to be, so thanks for answering.
 
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Madrab is wrong you can work on gas In Your own house but it isn't advisable as most home insurance becomes void and you have to prove you are competent to work on it if anything goes wrong
 
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Madrab is wrong you can work on gas In Your own house but it isn't advisable as most home insurance becomes void and you have to prove you are competent to work on it if anything goes wrong

Chances are if anything goes wrong you won't be around to prove whether you are competent or not, that the problem with the regs.
If you are talking about the regs then it has been proven that the regs are ambiguous and it all comes down to interpretation.
Though strictly speaking you are correct, the person only needs to be competent.
From the sixth edition GIUSP
"competance in gas safe installation work requires gas operatives to have enough knowledge, practical skill and experience to carry out the job in hand safely, with due regard to good working practice. knowledge must be kept up to date with awareness of changes in law, technology and safe working practice"
So strictly speaking, I should have said that and to prove competence the person should have their gas qualifications (ACS) but it really amounts to the same thing, minus the yearly fee, as being gas safe.
So it really is splitting hairs and for this forum I am quite happy to state that to work safely on gas, for everyones safety, they should be Gas Safe Registered.
Better that than give an un-experienced DIYer the idea that it's ok for them to work on their own gas supply/appliances and potentially create a life threatening situation for them and everyone around them IMO.
 
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Madrab is wrong you can work on gas In Your own house but it isn't advisable as most home insurance becomes void and you have to prove you are competent to work on it if anything goes wrong

The only way to legally demonstrate competence is to be qualified, this means doing an ACS, this gets you certificates of competence, it doesn't matter if you are on the Gas Safe Register, legally speaking.

Now lets assume something goes wrong and someone is killed by incorrect workmanship, a qualified person would be convicted of manslaughter by gross negligence. An unqualified person would, most likely, be convicted of criminally negligent manslaughter, big big difference.

A qualified person would serve a couple of years in prison and a ruined reputation, the unqualified person could be looking at a life sentence.
 

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