Glossing new doors... is flat or vertical best?

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I've had some new doors made for outhouses - tongue & groove boards. They are pre-primed and I'm keen to gloss them indoors before they're fitted, since it'll be a while before the weather is warm again!

I've only a bit of experience with gloss - mixed results shall we say. I wondered if painting them laid flat is a good option or best to prop them up vertical.

Something to get me out of the house around the 27th I reckon!
 
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I haven't bought it yet, we'll see...

Another question, what is the best way to deal with the tongue & groove 'gaps'? I am typically tempted to try and fill any tiny crack with paint but I don't know that's correct. Should I be trying to get the brush right into the grooves or just paint them vertically as normal and let the paint do its job?
 
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You won't be successful in filling all gaps with paint.
Just keep the layers thin and it will look good.
Are you doing them gloss white?
 
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Flat is much easier I find. I take them off and outdoors, but avoid the weather being too hot and a tie when there are no flies about. Paint or cut in the tongue joints first with a surplus of paint, so it will flow in.
 
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Personally, I prefer NOT to paint them flat.

One problem is finding somewhere to lay them flat.

The other problem is when one side is painted and dry, when you turn them over you risk damaging that new paint, which hasn't had time to go hard.

I find when the doors are hung, it's easier to see any imperfections, such as bits of crud that find their way into the new wet paint.
 
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Pros and Cons??

Pro for laying flat is that if you are using a brush and liquid gloss less runs especially for a DIYer
Con [as alluded to above] you have to ensure that the previously painted side is hard otherwise stripe marks you cannot get rid of.

Pro for standing up for a novice DIYer use a roller and non-drip paint??
Con possible runs if using a liquid paint, and brush

Con of rollers, little to no chance of infill of the joint between / at the tongue

As for priming and the tongues, what invariably happens is that after the first year of the timber being exposed to the elements especially sun shine [remember that?] is that the timber [has to] shrink and the un-painter areas of the tongues shine, if possible best to have the primer in a shade close to the finished colour?

Ken
 
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I'd always paint them hung. By the time I'd taken it off the door frame I'd have it all glossed up.
Also if you lie them flat, any dust or bits floating in the air will just land on them.
I had to do 56 door sides this week. I was seeing them in my sleep!
 
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Someone mentioned glossing using a roller - I had never heard that was even possible. Which is part of the struggle I have, not being expert with a brush.

Thanks for the various tips and insight.
 
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I'd always paint them hung. By the time I'd taken it off the door frame I'd have it all glossed up.
Also if you lie them flat, any dust or bits floating in the air will just land on them.
I had to do 56 door sides this week. I was seeing them in my sleep!
We're talking about new doors.
 
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Fair enough.
In that case OP, are you getting them measured up and hinges cut out before painting as quite often they have to be chamfered to fit the frames which then gives a bare edge that needs priming.
If you have more than 5 or 6 it may be worth using a roller but you need a decent 4 inch roller that's been washed through a few times. You'd brush in the grooves and then roller the edges and face, spreading the paint out. You then have a choice of a nice roller finish (orange peel) or you can lay them off with your brush.
 
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I've had some new doors made for outhouses - tongue & groove boards. They are pre-primed and I'm keen to gloss them indoors before they're fitted, since it'll be a while before the weather is warm again!

I've only a bit of experience with gloss - mixed results shall we say. I wondered if painting them laid flat is a good option or best to prop them up vertical.

Something to get me out of the house around the 27th I reckon!
Just noticed you are considering painting them before they are fitted - which suggests they haven't had the hinges and locks cut, doors handles fitted etc etc.

No way do you want to put the gloss coat on before this is done.

The doors will get scratched and marked and chipped.

And if the paint hasn't fully cured before fitting, you risk the soft paint getting 'torn' and it becomes a sticky mess.

I highly recommend you wait until they are fitted before glossing. You can always use a small heater in the outhouse to take the chill off.
 
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You can do primer and undercoat before fitting. Any scuffs can be patched before the topcoat goes on.

The grooves are best done when the timber is very dry, indoors in a dry environment

If you like painting doors flat, lift-off hinges will make it easier.
 
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