I hate battery powered drills!

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Big Tone

Short of a power cut, I have an endless source of reliable power any time I need it from our beloved mains supply. The same simply cannot be said of battery-powered drills. In fact your battery powered drill is nothing without our loving and caring mains supply. (Insert smug face here).

Now I will confess I don’t work in 'the industry', but when I worked with people who did and they needed real power from a Kango or when I hired something to drill a large opening for the flu of a gas fire to create a opening through a double-bricked wall, guess what powered them?

I rest my case... ;)

TBH this isn't just about these drills, I hate all things battery powered. I hope I live long enough to see the end of "opps, me battery is flat" :evil:
 
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And still, not one mains powered drill produces 60nm+ of torque in a one handed package.
 
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Big Tone

And still, not one mains powered drill produces 60nm+ of torque in a one handed package.
So where's the battery-powered equivalent of a Kango and why isn’t the battery-powered equivalent more popular than 'the clap' was in the 60s here now in 2011?

If you want a gun in a minute so you can shoot yourself in the foot... ;)
 
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And still, not one mains powered drill produces 60nm+ of torque in a one handed package.
So where's the battery-powered equivalent of a Kango and why isn’t the battery-powered equivalent more popular than 'the clap' was in the 60s here now in 2011?

A 'Kango' as you call them is a completely different tool. They rely on a high speed motor to achieve sufficient torque and impact rate. They can also be powered by air.

If you want a gun in a minute so you can shoot yourself in the foot... ;)

I have my own, thanks.
 
B

Big Tone

A 'Kango' as you call them is a completely different tool. They rely on a high speed motor to achieve sufficient torque and impact rate. They can also be powered by air.
I know they can also be powered by air, ( strawman argument ).

We are talking about electrons here, (Alternating Current @ 50 Hz ~220V RMS verses 24V DC), and if you are saying that a battery can do better then why the ""they rely on high speed motor to achieve sufficient torque and impact rate"
confused-smiley-013.gif
 
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A 'Kango' as you call them is a completely different tool. They rely on a high speed motor to achieve sufficient torque and impact rate. They can also be powered by air.
I know they can also be powered by air, ( strawman argument ).

We are talking about electrons here, (Alternating Current @ 50 Hz RMS verses 24V DC), and if you are saying that a battery can do better then why the ""they rely on high speed motor to achieve sufficient torque and impact rate"
confused-smiley-013.gif

I thought we were talking about drills, not impact tools.


Where do you keep getting 220V from?
 
B

Big Tone

I thought we were talking about drills, not impact tools.
Well I wasn't bud. I started because I'm ****ed off with battery powered drills - period!

And all I tried to do was give an account, my personal experiences, why they bug the crap out of me.

That was all bud. I wasn't having a go at you :)

Luv

Tone
action-smiley-010.gif
 
B

Big Tone


Where do you keep getting 220V from?
"Keep"???

Show me where I have used 220V before - anywhere in fact!??? It's a serious challenge. The mains, so I am told and as I know, varies.

I don't know why you said that?
confused-smiley-009.gif



To keep you happy in future, would you care to tell me what voltage I should use, or term, so that when someone else on this forum argues that I have referred to an inaccurate representation of our mains supply I can refer to this thread?
 
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Where do you keep getting 220V from?
"Keep"???

Show me where I have used 220V before - anywhere in fact!???

The mains, so I am told, varies.

Here:
Although the mains used be regarded as ~240 volts, these days it’s closer to 220 volt

And here:
Alternating Current @ 50 Hz ~220V RMS

Supply voltage in the UK is 230VAC+6%-10%, or 216V-253V. All existing 240V installations which are operating normally fall within this range and are untouched. New installations (that is, new transformers, not new connections to buildings) are 230V. This varies by a few volts depending on whether you're near to the transformer or at the end of the run, and how much load is on the transformer.
 
B

Big Tone

Here:
Although the mains used be regarded as ~240 volts, these days it’s closer to 220 volt

And here:
Alternating Current @ 50 Hz ~220V RMS
I am not hung-up on the precise voltage because it doesn’t actually matter if “the UK is 230VAC+6%-10%, or 216V-253V” for this topic or thread.

You are hung up on point scoring whereas I am hung up on the reason I started this thread.

Let’s see if you can see why I am not “hung up” on the precise voltage and a glaring difference between your quotes of me and what's in my quotes. (Hint ~)

On other forums this would be regarded as a topic drift and would be split from the thread.

So then, do you want to talk about the mains voltage, like some pedant, which is unrelated to my actuall OP about the disadvantages of battery-operated drills? Or do you just want to claim victory for knowing the UK voltage parameters?

Personally, I want to stick to my OP...
 
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I've got an old mains DeWalt drill somewhere in a drawer in the garage.

It's not been used in four or five years I bet.

I have a 24V makita SDS drill which will perform just as well as my old mains drill did.

I've also got a bosch 36V Li-ion battery SDS drill. It's not as powerful as the makita, but it's really lightweight and ideal for drilling fixings all day long.

Then finally a 10.8V bosch screw gun. It's really small and light weight, but powerful enough to drive a 4" x 10 screw straight into a pine joist.

I had a bosch 24V SDS before the makita which belonged to the company I used to work for and it got properly abused on a daily basis. I had it for 3 or 4 years, and it was still running perfectly when I left.

My makita is about 4 years old, the bosch is 2 years old, and the screw gun is about 5 years old.

I have had one battery pack up on the makita, but I've still got two more to go at.

All the rest have never missed a beat.
 
B

Big Tone

I would call that a nice and useful post thanks RF, and on topic.

If or when I come into some money anytime soon and feel it's time to give them an ~4th chance, I will ask you what battery-powered drill is currently the best and why. :)
 
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volts = the car engine ah[amps ]= the fuel tank
a bigger battery wont make the drill more powerful it will just extend the run time

i have 10 year old dewalt 18v nicads still going strong but at 60% capacity
same with bosh24v nicads and nmhs

infact i have so many tool batteries ranging from 10.8-24v i can get in excess off 500v if i wire them in series :D :eek: :eek:
 
B

Big Tone

A battery has internal resistance; it's what kills them all off as they age. There’s a difference between PD and EMF.

As a teacher once described it to me, as a kid interested in physics back in circa 72, amps are like the size of a tank and volts are like the speed at which it travels.

I'm not doing well; I'm like a knackered old 'Never Ready' PP3 with 0.0005V left,

Goodbye cruel world....
sad-smiley-047.gif


:D
 

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