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Insulating between battens on Victorian terraced house

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by jtmk, 10 Jul 2019.

  1. jtmk

    jtmk

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    I've removed the old lathe and plaster from my Victorian walls and plan to batten out and use 12.5mm plasterboard. Can I insulated between the battens? What's the best material to use?
     
  2. jonbey

    jonbey

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    In my 1930s house I stuck Kingspan on the walls with Everbuild pink dry fix foam, and plasterboard stuck over this (with a few mechanical fixings going into the bricks), all joins sealed with insulation tape.
    Sold, warm, vapour control.
     
  3. JohnD

    JohnD

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    You can use insulated plasterboard. Do your wiring first, preferably in conduit so later additions or alterations will be easier, especially in a kitchen where there are lots of outlets and some time-saving methods. Battens are not essential, but useful if the walls are not flat and level.
     
    Last edited: 10 Jul 2019
  4. opps

    opps

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    I am confused, the walls were lath and plaster. Why not just use rockwool in the cavity?

    Surely these are internal walls? I have never seen lath and plaster used on external walls.
     
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  5. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I have.
     
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  6. opps

    opps

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    Ok, I stand corrected, tnx.
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    Had it in the bays of an Edwardian house. May have been to save weight.

    My neighbour has a flint and lime Victorian house, two stories high, with brick quoins. the flint is not very stable and parts of it had to be rebuilt by a local specialist, There is a L&P inner wall battened to the flint. The builder was able to dismantle and rebuild the flint while leaving the original L&P in place. he used props and studs while working.
     
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  8. opps

    opps

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    Not too many of those here in west London. Mind you I did recently quote to do some work at the only house in Ealing with a thatched roof- AFAIK that is the only one in a stock of approximately 130,000 dwellings.
     
  9. JohnD

    JohnD

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    In my small town we also have (at least) one building with Mathematical Tiles.

    I like to point it out to visitors who think they know about building.
     
  10. opps

    opps

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    I had no idea that such a thing existed, tnx (again).
     
  11. bobasd

    bobasd

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    as above. definitely use insulated plasterboard but build it out, if necessary, with adhesive. try and stay away from mixing with battens.

    but, even with previously battened walls, before pulling out any wall(s) think it through esp ref reveals, frames, devices on walls, and sometimes doors - remember the p/b must be plumb and in plane and have 90 degree corners.

    and check for any damp signs - if the exterior is rendered then come back here.
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    It was more to save cost - you see it quite a bit in stairways, alcoves, etc in larger Victorian houses and shops, but it is pretty rare in smaller terraced houses of the period (at least in Lancashire, Yorkshire, etc - and in my experience)
     
  13. catlad

    catlad

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    I've seen it a few times on better quality houses of that era.
    I thought it was to keep the internal walls dry being solid brick construction.
    If it was my house I would use the honeycome damp proof membrane and then as Bob say's insulated plasterboard.
     
  14. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    For any given thickness, the most efficient insulation is silver foil backed eg celotex/kingspan/xtratherm etc. And if you are going to all this trouble, why use any other type?

    And it's always best to insulate in a way that does not impede on the internal face if possible. But there should always be a thin layer across the face to prevent pattern staining from the timber battens.
     
  15. opps

    opps

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    "there should always be a thin layer across the face to prevent pattern staining from the timber battens."

    Sorry Woody, what does that mean? I do not doubt that you are correct, I just got a bit lost. Tnx
     
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