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Osmo oil on wooden tabletop

Discussion in 'DIY Disasters' started by Kevin Hart, 31 Aug 2018.

  1. Kevin Hart

    Kevin Hart

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    I’m a new boy on the block and have come looking a bit of advice.

    Well it’s not actually a disaster I have but help would be appreciated.

    I’ve a round wooden table top addition to my kitchen island. I’m sure you e seen the type I mean. Anyway I decided to get rid of some watermarks and minor scratchers so sanded the whole thing down until all the blemishes were gone, then applied Osmo top oil.

    The problem is I think I’ve applied to much - four coats, and I think it would be true to say I overdone it with the last coat, it is now obvious that there is to much Osmo on the wooden top. The question is; what to do?

    I’ve picked this up from the Osmo site and it seems to describe my difficulty
    OK I have excess and it has dried could anyone give me a little bit more detail advice as to what to do with the methylated spirits

    As I indicated above this is a first post, so fingers crossed some of you can help

    Kevin
     
  2. securespark

    securespark

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    Is there a portion of treated area that is out of sight?

    What I'm getting at is that you could treat this area with a clean lint-free cloth that has a smidgeon of meths on it, rubbing very gently and then checking on the surface and the cloth to see how it is progressing.
     
  3. Kevin Hart

    Kevin Hart

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    OK I took the bull by the horns and with a deep breath

    Applied a coat of meths and gently rubbed it in. Then sanded the top with 120 grit sandpapergoing in a circular fashion, then took my polishing cloth to it

    I could see that a lot of the sticky residue remained but a lot had gone, or almost gone. I repeated the process with the same result a third and finally a fourth go. I’m sure I could have completed the task much quicker if I had sanded a bit bit more and a bit more virgously but I didn’t want to take any chances. The jobs still not 100 percent but it’s still better than it was before I started !

    The one upside was that if things really did foul up I could always have started over again

    Lesson learned!

    Kevin
     
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