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Poll: EICR Coding of a 'plastic' CU in domestic installation

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by JohnW2, 9 Sep 2020.

?

What code on an EICR do you think should be given to a plastic CU in a domestic installation?

  1. None

    5 vote(s)
    25.0%
  2. Always C3

    10 vote(s)
    50.0%
  3. Always C2

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. C2 if under stairs, in escape route etc., otherwise C3

    1 vote(s)
    5.0%
  5. C2 if under stairs, in escape route etc., otherwise none

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. None of above

    3 vote(s)
    15.0%
  7. C3 if under stairs, in escape route etc., otherwise none

    1 vote(s)
    5.0%
  1. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Given recent discussions, I thought it would be interesting to get a feel of what people think about the EICR coding of 'plastic CUs' in domestic installations.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  3. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    I win; got 100%. :)
     
  4. flameport

    flameport

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    C3 if not damaged, overheated or similar.
    C2 / C1 otherwise.
     
  5. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Surely if anyone thinks it C2, then it has ALWAYS been potentially dangerous - more than electricity in general.
     
  6. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I would say the same.

    The question should have said "an otherwise OK, but plastic, CU" - but I can't find a way of editing the question. I'll ask the mods if they can change it but, in the meantime, would everyone please note that the question was intended to say that.

    Flameport, do I take it that yours is the 'none of the above' vote? If so, the poll is set up such that you can change your vote if you wish, given what I've just said about what the question was actually intending to ask (the fact that a damaged CU will usually deserve a C2 or C1 is obvious, but that rather muddies the actual question of interest!).

    Kind Regards, John
     
  7. AndyPRK

    AndyPRK

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    I don't know. Trying to get people to change their vote! We live in the UK lol
     
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  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    We've been over this ground umpteen times.

    For a start, irrelevant though it is, my personal view is that plastic CUs are not, and never have been, sufficiently 'potentially dangerous' to warrant this wide-ranging regulatory change - and, even for those who disagree with me, to introduce a regulation which requires 'non-combustible material' but which does not require 'fire containment' is just plain daft!

    However, returning to the much-discussed point, what is regarded as 'unacceptably potentially dangerous' in 2020 might not have been considers as 'unacceptably potentially dangerous' in 2015, 1992, 1966 or any other date in the past.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  9. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    It was just a suggestion that might 'tidy' things, given that Flameport had indicated that he would have voted differently had I worded the question better!

    I suppose I had assumed that people would understand, given context, that I was not talking about a CU which was damaged (which, as Flameport said, might even deserve a C1) - but, rather, was asking about how it should be coded "just because it was plastic". However, I suppose I can't blame him (only myself!) for answering the question I wrote 'literally'!

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Having had a couple of off-list comments/questions, I would like to underline the above. I thought it would be obvious, but what I was trying to ask was how one should code an (otherwise fine) CU "just because it is plastic".

    In terms of what I actually wrote, Flameport's response (and, I presume, vote) was fair enough but it doesn't reflect the point of interest, since there is presumably no disagreement about the fact that a damaged CU may well warrant a C2, or even C1, even if it is metal and nowhere near the stairs or other escape routes.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Are there "official" escape routes in single dwellings? No?

    Isn't everywhere an escape route depending on where the fire is? Yes?
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I basically agree.

    I think that even in 'single dwellings' (I presume you mean dwellings occupied by a single household) with more than two stories there is an "official" escape route consisting of stairs/landings/halls (hence requirement for 'fire doors' on rooms opening into that space).

    I suppose that, in any house, the stairs (hence special consideration of 'under the stairs') can reasonably be considered to be part of a potential escape route, but that's about all.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    I meant normal houses.

    Really?

    Perhaps - logically - but not officially in what is meant by 'escape routes' in flats and offices - and not a lot of good when the hall or stairs are on fire and the window is the escape route.
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Certainly in the past (I haven't had reason to look for many years), and I find it hard to believe that the regs will have got any less demanding with the passage of time.

    It used to be (and probably still is) an issue in relation to 'loft conversions' - since, by adding a 'third storey' to what was originally a 2-storey house, one invoked the need for all doors opening into landings/halls to be 'fire doors' (plus some other requirements).
    Otyher than for the above, I agree that there are no "official escape routes" defined for 'normal houses' (which is perhaps why BS7671 removed the reference to 'escape routes' in the reg about cable fixation).

    However, we're down to common sense. If one can reduce the risk of stairs catching on fire, then one will reduce the need for people to resort to windows for escape from an upper floor in the event of a fire.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Yes, surely the (London) Fire Brigade should demand that stairs (and other parts) be constructed of non-combustible material.
     
  17. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Approved Dic B does, in fact, talk about "escape routes" in dwellings (and also seem to confirm what I said about fire doors etc.) ...
    ... and, if one gets 'taller' ....
    ... and, as I mentioned ...
    Kind Regards, John
     
    Last edited: 10 Sep 2020
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