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Rebuilding Bay Window... with minor alterations

Discussion in 'Building Regulations and Planning Permission' started by Oj01, 26 Nov 2020.

  1. Oj01

    Oj01

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    Hi All,

    Looking for some advice on how to proceed. I have a 1930s semi with a three section bay window. This was originally supported by the structural wooden frames, and unfortunately was at one point bodged (arent they all) for unsupportive UPVC frames, causing a slight drop above and visible cracking. Its not going to go anywhere, but its not great visually. (Rendered house, wooded framed bay upstairs, but filled with bricks!)

    I'm looking to rebuild the bay, and would really like to rebuild as a stone or brick framed. (similar to the properties across the street- this house is the odd one out)

    If I was to do so, would it require planning permission due to a slight change in the visible appearance? It would still be a bay, but just have slightly thicker uprights on the corners. If I was to remove the windows and jack the floor back up and insert a suitable lintel then replace the windows then I wouldnt...

    Thanks,
     
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  3. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    No pp required.
     
  4. DevilDamo

    DevilDamo

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    Assume the property is not within a Conservation Area, is listed or has had its PD rights removed? An easy way to check is to see if the houses opposite required Planning approval by jumping onto your Council’s website.
     
  5. Oj01

    Oj01

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    Thanks Woody, I’m assuming just building regs then? Cheers
     
  6. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    Strictly yes as you are altering the loading situation.

    Have you considered a timber frame, and then you can clad the front with a cement board and slips or suchlike? The advantage of a timber frame is that it less onerous for structural support and you can get much better insulation values without having to construct a thick masonry wall.

    Just consider all options not just the end visual effect
     
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  8. Oj01

    Oj01

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    It’s a good point, I hadn’t considered timber. Not sure how you’d go about proving the loading though. It’s a double height bay with pitch roof above.
     
  9. Oj01

    Oj01

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    One last question Woody, I think I’ve seen you talk about this before. But if rebuilt, it’s currently a 9in wall downstairs and 4.5in upstairs, would you have to rebuild as cavity wall or meet modern insulation standards?
     
  10. tony1851

    tony1851

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    You might find it tricky to re-build the upper bay in cavity-wall due to the need for support.
    Far easier to replace the single skin - in timber if necessary - and improve the insulation with internally-applied Kingspan or equivalent.
     
  11. ^woody^

    ^woody^

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    There is no requirement to build anything in cavity wall. As long as it stops water getting in that's the main criteria, and potentially insulated to current standards if necessary - although that would be wise to do in any case.

    Oh and fire resistance if close to boundaries.
     
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