Replacing damaged cable

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Good Morning,
While replacing the coax for my TV aerial I managed to put a I" auger through the ring main cable :oops:

I have cut out the damaged cable and replaced it by joining at a 30A junction box. Is this allowed/legal?

Thank you
Jim

Edit - A search brought up some posts saying crimping is a better way to do this repair. Is that correct?
 
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It does depend where the damage is: ie is the joint accessible?
 
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Securespark

The Damage is about 18" from the twin socket. I have replaced the cable using a 30A circular screw screw terminal junction box. It is accessible at present but will be under floorboards and laminate flooring when completed.

I believe in what your signature says and I want to do it right. Short of replacing the whole run of cable can I legally join it. I could solder and sleeve it. Is this acceptable?

Jim
 
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I believe in what your signature says and I want to do it right. Short of replacing the whole run of cable can I legally join it. I could solder and sleeve it. Is this acceptable?

A maintenance free box, such as the one mentioned above would probably be a better (and much easier) option than soldering it.
 
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Staggered soldered joints, individually sleeved and then overall sleeved, would probably be the most mechanically and electrically durable.

That's assuming you're any good with a soldering iron.
 
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Maintenance free 30 amp junction box made by Hager is the best thing in my opinion. Quick, easy and correct. Use green and yellow sleeving over the bare earth wires.

Any other method is fiddly.
 
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Thank you for the excellent replies.

sf I've never been 100% believer in crimps - even with very expensive tools.

jmcb I've got the gear for soldering to hand. I mean I'll wait to source the box if I must.

mf Yes, that's exactly how I'd do it. I'm good at soldering - did it for a living some years ago.

So if soldering is acceptable that's the way I'll go. If it's not, could someone please let me know.

Thanks again
Jim
 
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sw posts crossed. I'm still considering this and if it is the best solution that is the way I'll do it.

Thanks
Jim
 
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Our current electrician has extended the ring with (several) standard round junction boxes under a new glued and screwed t&g flooring...he knew this btw.

Seems you can do what you want when your qualified..!

:rolleyes:

Crimps ftw..!
 
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sw posts crossed. I'm still considering this and if it is the best solution that is the way I'll do it.

Thanks
Jim

For what it's worth, I prefer the mf junction box. Easier to inspect in the future if there's a possible fault.
 
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Soldered connections are fine, provided you mechanically join the two wires first. Usually this would be done by wrapping with a much finer wire.

Using the solder to mechanically fix the wires together is not acceptable.
 
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I like to crimp with bare thru crimps, and then solder the wires into the crimp if the joint really is going to be inaccesible.

It's got mechanical strength from the crimp, and great electrical connection from the solder.
 
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