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Scoring bottom of door to prevent chipping?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Keitai, 5 Jan 2021.

  1. Keitai

    Keitai

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    I lined circular saw cutting edge to where I wanted cut then righted the clamps . Do you score a line half a mm above this point to prevent chipping?

    With air bags, I used one one hinge side with door open to line up to screw hole. Seemed easiest way 20210105_165230.jpg 20210105_162135.jpg 20210105_155331.jpg 20210105_161340.jpg
     
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  3. chirpychippy

    chirpychippy

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    If you think it's going to chip then yes score the paint, might be as well to square the line around the door a score the other side at least then neither side should chip, finish with sand paper.
     
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  4. Swwils

    Swwils

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    Cut through two sacrificial boards each side and it will prevent chipping.
     
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  5. Keitai

    Keitai

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    Sand after cutting I guess. Once you've worked out where blade is cutting on circular saw do you score the door exactly where the cut is going or 1mm higher so any chipping will only be 1mm high?
     
  6. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    If you turn the saw around the other way (so the majority of the base is sitting on the door, not just a tiny bit - your straight edge will need to be a bit further up from the bottom AND a lot thinner, say 12mm plywood) there is another technique:-

    1. Set your straight edge up and clamp in place

    2. Score the exit edge with a knife and steel square

    3. Set the saw to make a 1mm deep cut - NO MORE THAN 1.5 MM UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES

    4. Make a scoring cut by drawing the saw slowly backwards whilst holding it against the fence. THIS IS A CLIMB CUT AND NEEDS TO BE TAKEN VERY SLOWLY INDEED. ABSOLUTELY NEVER MAKE THIS CUT WITH MORE THAN ABOUT 1.5 MM OF BLADE PROJECTION AND NEVER STAND DIRECTLY BEHIND THE SAW. This is called a scoring cut

    5. Set the depth for the main cut. I suggest sawing the door in 2 or 3 incremental passes if using a cordless saw or a corded saw if limited power

    6. When finished if your door is veneer-faced I suggest adding a 1 to 2mm chamfer to the front and rear edges with a very sharp block plane used at a skewed angle, planing into the door, as this will limit any tendency for the veneer to catch on flooring and chip off. This is especially true of thickly carpeted floors. I sometimes do the same with laminate-faced commercial doors if there is no intention to protect the door bottom with a kick plate. Even if you don't do a scoring cut this micro chamfer can be very handy to deal with minor chipping

    Even if you don't use your saw this way, running the larger part of the base on the door, as opposed to attempting to run the narrowest part of the base on a tiny ledge, as shown in your photos, will be safer and will more readily produce an edge which is perpendicular to the surface and is considerably safer
     
    Last edited: 12 Jan 2021
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  7. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Buy a good blade and cut the f#cker.
     
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  8. Keitai

    Keitai

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    1610554414100689183274755081065.jpg View attachment 218337
    Just tried it. It worked great. The climb cut I mean. See photos. Door not painted yet though.

    Regarding chamfre, I used blockpane at 45 degrees along bottom. I guess this would need painting afterwards. 1610554414100689183274755081065.jpg 1610554414100689183274755081065.jpg



    20210113_160635.jpg 20210113_160350.jpg 20210113_160341.jpg
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2021
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  9. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    A good blade would've done better in 20 seconds.
    I've never seen anyone wasting so much time on cutting a door which needs to be painted anyway.
    I admire your dedication...
     
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  11. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Yes, but a very small chamfer isn't too noticeable. The old workarounds used to be Tippex for white doors or a Sharpie for black ones!

    With regards to the mitre plane, I would recommend that you skew the blade a little (point the nose 10° or to the left as viewed in your picture) as this effectively reduces the attack angle of the blade, reducing the tendency to break out bits of veneer on veneered doors (these are normally applied to the door in vertical orientation and are more likely to tear or chip if planed straight across without a skewed blade)
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2021
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  12. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    Sandpaper block, 10 seconds and impossible to mess up.
    Bottom and top of the doors are treated by good craftsmen (varnish, paint or anything that would seal it).
     
  13. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    Sandpaper block? Just as possible to mess up on veneered doors if you sand the wrong way.... (seen that far too many times)
     
  14. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    What grade do you use?
    20???
    Ever tried a 240 grit?
     
  15. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    I use a block plane out on site because it can be difficult to get decent sandpaper in the right grits out of contractors, and in any case there is always a nice sharp block plane in my box or in my pocket. It"s a personal preference I've had for more than 4 decades. In any case, if you rub any sandpaper across the bottom edge of the door and across the veneer last it can pick up and break out the veneer at the edge, especially brittle stuff like some oak veneers. It happens, especially if you are trying to keep an eye on a mixed bag of apprentices, improvers, non-English speakers, low grade agency staff, fly by night price work bods, etc
     
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  16. johnny2007

    johnny2007

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    I don't know where you get your sandpaper and how gigantic your muscles are, but I would have hard time chipping a veneer with 240 grit on a block of wood, even if I wanted to.
     
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  17. Keitai

    Keitai

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    10 degrees is for climb cut pulling saw backwards with 1mm depth? Out of interest if I was to score I guess you run Stanley blades left side on right side of where saw is cutting? So you have width of Stanley blade above where saw is going to cut?



    16106308847322797831658822606547.jpg
     
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