1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Slightly obstructed!

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by seasickstevie, 22 Nov 2015.

  1. seasickstevie

    seasickstevie

    Joined:
    14 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    1,538
    Thanks Received:
    83
    Location:
    Liverpool
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Washing machine & dishwasher plugged in behind kitchen units.

    Removed a section of the back panel to show: electrician and plumber/gasfitter were not singing from the same hymn sheet.

    End result: Not got brilliant access or adequate isolation ... an understatement perhaps? 20151120_134314.jpg
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. securespark

    securespark

    Joined:
    11 Jan 2004
    Messages:
    35,064
    Thanks Received:
    1,114
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Well, the socket must have been there first so that makes the plumber/ gas fitter an utter lazy arse!
     
  4. Jackrae

    Jackrae

    Joined:
    20 Nov 2012
    Messages:
    2,109
    Thanks Received:
    349
    Location:
    Dumfriesshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    But they must have been GasSafe "qualified/certified" to undertake such work :(
     
  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    44,390
    Thanks Received:
    2,815
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    What about being "GasSafe 'qualified/certified' " prevents one being a lazy arse (or, indeed, just plain stiupid)? :)

    Kind Regards, John
     
  6. stillp

    stillp

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2009
    Messages:
    4,496
    Thanks Received:
    338
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    BS 6891: Specification for the installation and maintenance of low pressure gas installation pipework of up to 35 mm (R1¼) on premises

    8.16.2 Separation of installation pipework from other services

    Where installation pipes are not separated by electrical insulating material, they shall be spaced as follows: a) at least 150 mm away from electricity meters and associated excess current controls, electrical switches or sockets, distribution boards or consumer units; b) at least 25mm away from electricity supply and distribution cables.
     
  7. Jackrae

    Jackrae

    Joined:
    20 Nov 2012
    Messages:
    2,109
    Thanks Received:
    349
    Location:
    Dumfriesshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'd have thought that one of the purposes of employing someone who has undergone some form of training and obligatory certification was the expectation of them doing a job to a satisfactory standard and the application of a modicum of common sense.

    Ah well ...... pay peanuts, get monkeys
     
  8. securespark

    securespark

    Joined:
    11 Jan 2004
    Messages:
    35,064
    Thanks Received:
    1,114
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    How d'you know the payment was peanuts?
     
  9. stillp

    stillp

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2009
    Messages:
    4,496
    Thanks Received:
    338
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    From the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations:

    Safe use of pipes

    18.—(1) No person shall install any installation pipework in any position in which it cannot be used with safety having regard to the position of other pipes, pipe supports, drains, sewers, cables, conduits and electrical apparatus and to any parts of the structure of any premises in which it is installed which might affect its safe use.
     
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    44,390
    Thanks Received:
    2,815
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm not sure that is borne out by the heated discussion I had about 'bonding' with the GasSafe registered/certified/whatever person I had here recently! In the end, he refused to do the (trivial) gas work because I would not let him install the umpteen unnecessary bonding conductors he wanted to install, because he said that the gas installation would be "far too dangerous to work on" without that bonding. Maybe, hopefully, his understanding of safety issues relating to gas were somewhat better informed.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. PBC_1966

    PBC_1966

    Joined:
    1 Sep 2015
    Messages:
    2,409
    Thanks Received:
    210
    Location:
    Redding, California
    Country:
    United States
    Now my curiosity has been peaked - Would you care to elucidate?
     
  13. securespark

    securespark

    Joined:
    11 Jan 2004
    Messages:
    35,064
    Thanks Received:
    1,114
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    :jumpingupanddownfuriously:

    Metoometoometoo!!
     
  14. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    44,390
    Thanks Received:
    2,815
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Just the usual 'plumber thing' plus a bit more - he wanted to connect everything to everything else with bits of G/Y cable but, worse, wanted to run 'main bonds' from the boiler back to the (fairly distant) MET (which would have been very disruptive), despite the fact that the gas (LPG) and water services are main bonded where they enter the property. Had it just been a matter of his (unnecessary) 'cross-bonding', I would probably have let him amuse himself by installing them, but there was no way that I was going to have my house taken apart to route his crazy 'main bonds'! He had some extraordinary idea that there was a requirement for 'main bonds' to be visible at the location of the boiler!

    Kind Regards, John
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  15. stillp

    stillp

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2009
    Messages:
    4,496
    Thanks Received:
    338
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I suspect that regulation 10 might have something to do with it:
    Maintaining electrical continuity
    10. In any case where it is necessary to prevent danger, no person shall carry out work in relation to a gas fitting without using a suitable bond to maintain electrical continuity until the work is completed and permanent electrical continuity has been restored.

    The word "bond" perhaps sticks in whatever passes for a brain in these people.
     
  16. JohnW2

    JohnW2

    Joined:
    28 Jan 2011
    Messages:
    44,390
    Thanks Received:
    2,815
    Location:
    Buckinghamshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Maybe, but that presumably refers to a temporary bond between parts whilst undertaking work?
    It seems so - he kept going on and on about these (certainly not temporary!) 'main bonds' that he said were required!!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  17. stillp

    stillp

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2009
    Messages:
    4,496
    Thanks Received:
    338
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes, I think so. Changing a meter, for example.
     
Loading...

Share This Page