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Using a blanking plate to indicate safe zone

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by williamglossop, 31 Jul 2017.

  1. williamglossop

    williamglossop

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    Can you use a blanking plate (fixed to a patress box obviously) to show a vertical cable run down a wall? It's the cable that supplies lighting to the attic and it's passes up one if the bedroom walls in an area where there are no switches or sockets.
     
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  3. Others will be along to confirm but I believe this is OK. Personally though I think it'd look a bit naff - is there no other way you can achieve the same result? I'd even be tempted to put a socket in to be honest, but I guess if it's hidden by furniture then it's probably, at least aesthetically acceptable.
     
  4. RobertPW

    RobertPW

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    I don't think a socket on the lighting circuit would be advisable. Stick a blanking plate on it and hang a picture over it
     

  5. Just for the record - that is in no way what I was advising. I now realise I could have been clearer.
     
  6. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Technically the answer is no.

    The cable should be connected to an accessory - but if the cable runs through the back box then it will be apparent.
    As you say, it will look naff.

    You can, of course, run up within 150mm. of a corner with no need for a blank plate.
     
  7. rsgaz

    rsgaz

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    No, the cable must be connected to an accessory...

    My Complete DIY Rewire

    Is it near the corner of a wall?

    Gaz :)

    edit: didn't see EFLI's post until after.
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed. If one is fanatical about complying with regulations and does not mind introducing an 'unnecessary joint' (technically impairing the 'safety' of the installation) then I think one can probably achieve compliance by cutting the cable and joining the cut ends in a connector block (or Wagos, or whatever) within the back box - daft though that may sound.

    Kind Regards, John
     
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  9. stillp

    stillp

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    Only if you think a connector block is an accessory. (Does it comply with BS1363...?)
     
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  11. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    No. 522.6.202 does not refer only to accessories. It refers to a cable connected to a "point, accessory or switchgear" - and I reckon that a connector block counts as a 'point' (to which the cable is connected), don't you?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  12. stillp

    stillp

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    Yes, you're right, I should have checked first. I wonder what they meant by a "point"? Oh, hang on, it's "A termination of the fixed wiring intended for the connection of current-using equipment".

    Hmm...
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I hadn't noticed that they defined 'point'!

    OK, then, stick a neon and resistor between L and N of the connector block (inside the back box) - that will use a little current :)

    Kind Regards, John
     
  14. williamglossop

    williamglossop

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    I agree- it's not ideal, but it's not my house ir my installation. I'm helping a friend with some plastering and this is how the electrician has left it. There is a socket on the same wall about 2 meters to the left. I was going to put the blanking plate inline with the cable and horizontal to the socket
     
  15. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Regulations aside, I would personally say that what you are proposing is 'reasonable', provided that the cable actually passes through the back box to which the blank plate is attached. If the cable didn't go through the box, someone who didn't like the look of the blank plate could remove it, and the back box, and fill the hole with plaster. I think that would be more-or-less within the spirit, if not teh word, of the regulations.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  16. securespark

    securespark

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    Would you like to join me behind the sofa?
     
  17. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    A shaky beginning.

    :whistle:


    If the cable went through the box, someone who didn't like the look of the blank plate could remove it, and fill the back box with plaster.

    If the cable went through the box, and in there it had been cut and the cut ends joined in a connector block (or Wagos, or whatever), someone who didn't like the look of the blank plate could remove it, and fill the back box with plaster.
     
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