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Which lithium ion drill/driver to buy.

Discussion in 'Tools and Materials' started by sunama, 7 Dec 2009.

  1. Deluks

    Deluks

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    He's thorough and thrifty!

    BA: From what I have gathered, the traditional hand-dug trench will give one a far more comfortable 'eternal rest'

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. big-all

    big-all

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    if you where going for 6x180 day in day out i would suggest 18v
    and 150 would suggest 14.4 i personaly wouldnt expect 10.8 to be overly happy with 7" [i assume]bolts but should easily out perform your 24v bosch ;)

    but the point is dont go for a tool that can do the maximum
    go for the tool thats the lightest and can cover the day to day tasks
    if its too cumbersome it will spend its time in the box un-used
     
  4. sunama

    sunama

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    I shall report back on how the Hitchi performs. The driver should be delivered today, but the screws will not arrive until wednesday next week.

    Yeah tell me about it. I bought an electric drill when I first moved into my place and it hardly gets touched. I would much rather use the portable 14.4v Challenge Extreme drill which hardly holds a charge and whose drill speed has dropped from around 700RPM to around 200RPM.

    Portable drills really are the bees knees and thats one reason why I went for the baby 10.8v Hitachi.
     
  5. big-all

    big-all

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    if he gets the recip he can cut the turf edging lol ;)

    and as deluks and myself both have the bosch and ryobi impacts we can do a comparason between hitch and bosch impacts :D
     
  6. sunama

    sunama

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    Right gents. I havent began my project yet (this will happen next wednesday), as I still havent bought the screws - all other materials have arrived.

    The Hitach arrived and I was impressed with its small size and light weight. Both the impact driver and drill driver feel like quality items.

    As an exeriment, I charged up the Hitachi batteries and tested the driver on some screws.

    3.5 x 40mm - screwed and unscrewed easily.
    6 x 70mm - screwed and unscrewed easily.
    8 x 140mm - screwed at decent speed, but will not unscrew. The screw is locked solid.

    I will report back once I have the other screw lengths, but if there are any questions that people have about this impact driver, feel free to ask.
     
  7. Deluks

    Deluks

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    Sounds about right for performance, don't be too worried about the 140mm screw, it's a 'once in a blue moon' size for most DIY purposes. Try this, put a (good quality) screwdriver in the and of the screw and tap with a hammer. Then try removing it using the impact. For future driving, if the screw needs to be removed at any point, coat the thread in beeswax or rub it on a bar of soap. Both methods will lubricate the screw and it should go in and come out easier. Gold coloured screws are also easier to install and remove. I try to avoid using plain old silver screws over 50mm long.
     
  8. sunama

    sunama

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    Thanks for the tip.

    I've also just had a play with the Hitachi Drill driver.
    I paired it with the following drill bit:
    http://www.screwfix.com/search.do;j...WCSTHZPCFEY?_dyncharset=UTF-8&fh_search=89800

    I tried drilling a 2x4 block of wood, at both low and high speed (the drill driver comes with a high - low speed setting).

    In both cases, the drill cut through the wood like a hot knife through butter.

    Both drivers appear to be of high quality, but I will be able to give a better review of the 2 drivers once I have completed the project.

    Fist impressions are good, though.
     
  9. big-all

    big-all

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    bet your glad we talked you out off cheap cheap cheap and towards value and quality :D :D ;)
     
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  11. sunama

    sunama

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    Yes yes.

    I'm actually looking forward to using these 2 tools, which is funny given that I have an electric drill which is more powerful.

    Its just that the Hitachi drivers are so small and accessable. Plugging in an electric drill seems cumbersome.
     
  12. big-all

    big-all

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    my workshop is only 10x12ft but i have 11 twin sockets around at head hieght so very very handy and accesable and i use them first ----------



    ----wrong i use my battery circ saw planer jigsaw router pin gun ect first even though theres "sky hooks" in the roof to hold the cables out the way :D :D
     
  13. sunama

    sunama

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    I've read that lubricating with soap allows the screw to rust. Is this true, also for indoor timbers or only if the screw is used externally?

    I would like to use the 'soap technique', however, I'm worried that the screws will end up rusting and falling apart over time.

    For lubricating the screws, could I use vaseline?

    If beeswax is the best, can I use the following item which contains beeswax and turpentine:
    http://www.lawsonshop.co.uk/productinfo.php?pid=7140

    I shall be starting the project on Monday 28th Dec 2009 - all my materials have arrived.

    Ive tried driving a 200x6mm screw and it successfully goes in, all the way, using the Hitachi impact driver - the problem is that once it gets past the 100mm mark, the driving speed is very very slow. Lubricated with soap, increases the driving speed.
     
  14. big-all

    big-all

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    use candle grease[a candle]

    in my humble opinion you are overloading the impact
    if a screw takes more than around 10to 20 seconds its overloaded

    are you shure you need 200mm screws what are you screwing together

    if its something like 150mm timber you dont go through the top you start 50mm up from the bottom at a 30 degree angle and use 100mm srews one each side[skew screw/nail]

    merry x mass :D :D
     
  15. sunama

    sunama

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    I'm going to be hanging 125mm timber battens on the ceiling, parallel to one another, all along the ceiling, 60 cm centres.

    I shall then be filling the gaps with insulation.

    I shall then be screwing 50mmx47mm battens to the bigger battens, at 60cm centres. The gaps between battens shall be filled with insulation.

    I shall then be hanging plasterboard (plank, 19mm) onto the 50mm battens.

    The 125mm timber battens will have a lot of force pulling them down, which is why I have chosen to use 200mm screws - I dont want the ceiling falling down on my head at a later date.

    I havent timed the duration it takes for the screw to be screwed in, but it does fall in the 10s-20s time frame. With lube, it goes in faster.

    I shall buy a candle and see how that performs. Thanks for the tip. I think these long screws definitely need some sort of lube to ease them into the timber.
     
  16. gregers

    gregers

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    if im doing a lot of screwing,(oooerrrr missus)then i will get my pot of tallow out.which i have owned for about 15 years and theres still loads left,iirc got from some sparkys on a shop fit when they were using large barrell for there wires.
     
  17. sunama

    sunama

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    Right gents, I have completed my project (new ceiling, to help reduce sound travelling from the floor above) and have extensively tested out the Hitachi set.

    The hitachi set performed admirably.

    I was using some very very long screws indeed, though not all of the screw was screwing through timber - part of the screw was sitting in timber with a drilled hole. What I can say is that the impact driver had no problem screwing about 150mm of 6 x 200mm screws. Approximately 90 screws were used, out of which 2 got stuck, ie. they wouldnt unscrew or screw - they jammed in the wood. Perhaps if I had access to an 18v impact driver, this tool would've been able to turn those screws.

    The impact driver is very small and compact and is ideal for screwing screws in cramped positions. The tool has a very high quality feel to it and performed without a hitch during the project.

    The cordless drill driver was VERY handy. throughout the project, although I had access to a big/heavy SDS drill and an electric drill, I hardly touched these, when drilling through wood. The 10.8v drill driver is very compact, is easy to handle and quite powerful, when drilling through wood. Obviously the choice of drill bit is important, but I was impressed with the performance of the drill driver.

    Though the electric drill has a MUCH higher RPM, the 10.8v drill driver is just so convenient to use, due to its small size.

    I can see that in the next 20 years or so, all tools will move in the direction of getting smaller and lighter (like the Hitachi), while maintaining the outright power of some of the bigger tools available today. For the professional who uses these tools year round, I can see massive benefits of using these small tools, over the larger tools, even though the larger tools offer more power.

    I would rate the Hitachi set, which I bought for around £90, 9.5/10. The only reason why I knocked off 0.5, is because the impact driver was unable to turn 2 screws which had managed to get stuck in the timber. For £90 though, I honestly can't see a better deal out there right now.
     
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