16amp microwave oven

Is the solution to this not very simple?

If the oven really is >13A and comes with a 16A plug fitted then one easy solution is to fit a matching 16A socket (presumably Shuko) to the regulations of an EU member state where such sockets are used.

That would probably not comply after 31st January
 
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That would probably not comply after 31st January
I think that's an example of one of the myths (used by some as 'scare tactics') which has been flying around in relation to all this 'Brexit' nonsense.

There is nothing about the UK's acceptance of things compliant with EU standards which requires the UK to be a member of the EU, any more than, for example, there is any requirement for those few dusty corners of the world which also use BS 1363 accessories to be 'part of the UK'.

Kind Regards, John
 
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I think that's an example of one of the myths (used by some as 'scare tactics') which has been flying around in relation to all this 'Brexit' nonsense.

There is nothing about the UK's acceptance of things compliant with EU standards which requires the UK to be a member of the EU, any more than, for example, there is any requirement for those few dusty corners of the world which also use BS 1363 accessories to be 'part of the UK'.

Kind Regards, John
Currently any member states regs are applicable here but I don't know how long it's likely to take to remove them from our statute, once they are removed I'd lay a bet that any non BS connector would become a failure on an EICR especially as many do not include shutters.
 
Wiring regulations are not statutory, and the content will not be changing after we leave the EU.
It's one of the few things that is entirely unchanged by Brexit.
 
Wiring regulations are not statutory, and the content will not be changing after we leave the EU.
It's one of the few things that is entirely unchanged by Brexit.
Well part of it is but not much, however the bit I was referring to is the statute which basically means any rules on any member state are applicable in any other. Excuse my silly over simplification of the facts.
 
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Currently any member states regs are applicable here but I don't know how long it's likely to take to remove them from our statute, ...
I'm not really aware of any UK statutes which require (or even 'allow') compliance with any particular "Member State's Regulations" - and, even if there were, I don't think that would have anything to do with whether or not we were an 'EU Member State' ourselves. Although I doubt that there are any examples, I don't think there's any reasons why UK legislation could not refer to US, Canadian, Japanese, Russian or whatever Standards/Regulations if it really wanted to!
...once they are removed I'd lay a bet that any non BS connector would become a failure on an EICR especially as many do not include shutters.
It that not already the case? EICRs are undertake with reference not to laws but, rather, with reference to BS 7671, and there seems little doubt that BS 7671 only allows socket outlets to BS 1363 BS 546 ior BS EN 60309-2, or a clock connector/shaver socket [the only conceivable wriggle room seemingly being in relation to 553.1.5(iii)]

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Kind Regards, John
 

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What about 120.3?
That doesn't really say anything (at least, not that I can really understand!) - merely that deliberate departures from (non-mandatory) BS 7671 "shall" not result in a degree of safety of the installation less than that obtained by compliance with BS 7671. I'm not sure what that "shall" is all about - it is (rather confusingly) suggesting that something which is non-compliant with BS 7671 can be compliant with BS 7671 if it does not result in a lesser degree of safety than would 'direct compliance' with BS 7671 ?!!
Also what is the wording of the reference to methods complying with other standards? I can't find it.
Same problem here. I looked, but could not find it in BS 7671, OSG or App Doc P. Maybe it's gone? When I have a moment I'll look in some earlier versions of BS 7671.

Kind Regards, John
 
Wiring regulations are not statutory, and the content will not be changing after we leave the EU.
Indeed.
It's one of the few things that is entirely unchanged by Brexit.
I'm not so sure about that - there seem to be any number of 'myths' about. We are party to ('signed up to', 'participate in', 'collaborate with') any number of EU 'systems' which, at least theoretically, do not require membership of the EU - so it is far from a foregone conclusion that departure from the EU will sever all our connections with such systems.

Kind Regards, John
 
A good indicator of the current drawn by an appliance is the size of the flexible cable used to connect it to a power source. The cable size is embossed on the outer sheath and will show the number and cross-sectional area of the cores, for example 3x1.5mm².

0.75mm² is rated at 6A, 1.0mm² is rated at 10A, 1.25mm² is rated at 13A (almost exclusively UK), 1.5mm² is rated at 16A and finally 2.5mm² rated at 25A. (Other sizes are available but are not relevant to this answer)
 
A good indicator of the current drawn by an appliance is the size of the flexible cable used to connect it to a power source. The cable size is embossed on the outer sheath and will show the number and cross-sectional area of the cores, for example 3x1.5mm². 0.75mm² is rated at 6A, 1.0mm² is rated at 10A, 1.25mm² is rated at 13A (almost exclusively UK), 1.5mm² is rated at 16A and finally 2.5mm² rated at 25A. (Other sizes are available but are not relevant to this answer)
Whilst that is all true, I don't think it necessarily helps in the present context ...

... as you say, 1.25mm² cable is pretty uncommon outside of the UK, so any appliance designed for global (or merely pan-European) sale that draws 10A to 16A is likely to come with a 1.5mm² cable, even if the actually current draw (maybe 'with diversity') is ≤13A.

Kind Regards, John
 
A good indicator of the current drawn by an appliance is the size of the flexible cable used to connect it to a power source. The cable size is embossed on the outer sheath and will show the number and cross-sectional area of the cores, for example 3x1.5mm².

0.75mm² is rated at 6A, 1.0mm² is rated at 10A, 1.25mm² is rated at 13A (almost exclusively UK), 1.5mm² is rated at 16A and finally 2.5mm² rated at 25A. (Other sizes are available but are not relevant to this answer)
Sadly we can't rely on this. My old workshop 2.2KW kettle has 0.75mm² flex as does my 1800W Flymo, C19/20 leads (16A) under 1.5m only require 1.0mm²
 
That would appear to support John's view about diversity when time is the only variable.

However, none of the examples applies to current above 13A flowing through a UK socket, plug and fuse.
 

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